Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The ABCs of Behavior Change: Skills for Working with Behavior Problems in Nursing Homes

Diane M Brooks, MS, RN, CS

Abstract

The ABCs of Behavior Changes Skills tor Working with Behavior Problems In Nursing Homes vtargaref Cohn, Michael Smyer, Ann Horgas; State College, PA: Venture Publishing; 1 994; 236 pages; $29.95; softcover

This training manual is designed for nursing staff - mainly nursing assistants in long-term care facilities and is ntended for use by staff development educators. Outlines are provided for six one-hour classes and nclude objectives, key :ontent, teaching strategies, handouts or audiovisual aids, exercises, activities, background references for instructors; as well as pre- and post-test for the entire course. The classes can be given separately or in one day-long session.

The content covers communications with residents, observing behavior, guiding confused behavior, encouraging less depressed behavior, reducing agitated behavior, and making personal changes. Suggestions are made for an incentive system to reward and reinforce trainees. In general, the lessons are easy to understand and apply. Experienced staff development educators should have little difficulty in utilizing the content. Those with less experience will appreciate the step-by-step outlines and suggestions.

While changing behavior is not as easy as it may seem from the lessons, increased understanding of behavior and its causes is definitely beneficial. This would therefore be a good resource for any of the staff as well as the staff development educator in any long-term care facility.…

The ABCs of Behavior Changes Skills tor Working with Behavior Problems In Nursing Homes vtargaref Cohn, Michael Smyer, Ann Horgas; State College, PA: Venture Publishing; 1 994; 236 pages; $29.95; softcover

This training manual is designed for nursing staff - mainly nursing assistants in long-term care facilities and is ntended for use by staff development educators. Outlines are provided for six one-hour classes and nclude objectives, key :ontent, teaching strategies, handouts or audiovisual aids, exercises, activities, background references for instructors; as well as pre- and post-test for the entire course. The classes can be given separately or in one day-long session.

The content covers communications with residents, observing behavior, guiding confused behavior, encouraging less depressed behavior, reducing agitated behavior, and making personal changes. Suggestions are made for an incentive system to reward and reinforce trainees. In general, the lessons are easy to understand and apply. Experienced staff development educators should have little difficulty in utilizing the content. Those with less experience will appreciate the step-by-step outlines and suggestions.

While changing behavior is not as easy as it may seem from the lessons, increased understanding of behavior and its causes is definitely beneficial. This would therefore be a good resource for any of the staff as well as the staff development educator in any long-term care facility.

10.3928/0098-9134-19960101-11

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