Journal of Gerontological Nursing

NEWS 

Update on AD Research Available

Abstract

The statement on the front cover of the Progress Report on Alzheimer's Disease 1994 is "Research is the key to unlocking the mysteries of Alzheimer's Disease." Although there is no cure for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), scientists are moving closer to pinpointing the basic mechanisms at work in the brain and learning the deviations from these mechanisms that cause AD.

The report, published by the National Institute on Aging, the Institute within the National Institutes of Health, provides a brief overview of basic brain function and discusses changes that take place as a result of the disease. Brief summaries of recent research include identification of several AD-related genetic mutations/ and establishment of a relationship between the gene for a protein, ApoE4, and the development of late-onset AD; discovery of possible clues to the causes of cell death; and use of specialized one-to-one activities with patients, to identify ways to prevent, reduce or manage the disruptive behaviors associated with AD.

For a single copy of the report, write: Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center, PO Box 8250, Silver Spring, MD 20907-8250;.800-438-4380.…

The statement on the front cover of the Progress Report on Alzheimer's Disease 1994 is "Research is the key to unlocking the mysteries of Alzheimer's Disease." Although there is no cure for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), scientists are moving closer to pinpointing the basic mechanisms at work in the brain and learning the deviations from these mechanisms that cause AD.

The report, published by the National Institute on Aging, the Institute within the National Institutes of Health, provides a brief overview of basic brain function and discusses changes that take place as a result of the disease. Brief summaries of recent research include identification of several AD-related genetic mutations/ and establishment of a relationship between the gene for a protein, ApoE4, and the development of late-onset AD; discovery of possible clues to the causes of cell death; and use of specialized one-to-one activities with patients, to identify ways to prevent, reduce or manage the disruptive behaviors associated with AD.

For a single copy of the report, write: Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center, PO Box 8250, Silver Spring, MD 20907-8250;.800-438-4380.

10.3928/0098-9134-19950501-17

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