Journal of Gerontological Nursing

NEWS 

Booklet Offers Information About "Dying at Home"

Abstract

When completing a living will or other advance medical directive, often people are concerned just as much about where they will die, as how they will die. To address these concerns, Choice in Dying, a national not-for-profit organization who produced the first living will in 1967, has published a new booklet, "Dying at Home." The 20-page booklet offers practical information about the option to die at Home, explores related legal issues and considerations and provides answers to common questions associated with the decision to die at home.

"Many people who opt to refuse life support also wish to refuse the entire experience of dying in an unfamiliar setting. That's why going home to die is a growing trend," according to Dr. Karen Orloff Kaplan, executive director of Choice in Dying.

Interest in dying at home and home care is encouraged by at least three factors: patients' and families' desire to retain control over care; a growing awareness of the limitations of medical technology to enhance patients' end-of-life care; and limited reimbursement for hospital care when dying patients are not receiving active, life-prolonging treatment.

The booklet will answer many legal and ethical questions that arise among caregivers and patients. For more information, call Choice in Dying at 212-366-5540 or 800-989WILL.…

When completing a living will or other advance medical directive, often people are concerned just as much about where they will die, as how they will die. To address these concerns, Choice in Dying, a national not-for-profit organization who produced the first living will in 1967, has published a new booklet, "Dying at Home." The 20-page booklet offers practical information about the option to die at Home, explores related legal issues and considerations and provides answers to common questions associated with the decision to die at home.

"Many people who opt to refuse life support also wish to refuse the entire experience of dying in an unfamiliar setting. That's why going home to die is a growing trend," according to Dr. Karen Orloff Kaplan, executive director of Choice in Dying.

Interest in dying at home and home care is encouraged by at least three factors: patients' and families' desire to retain control over care; a growing awareness of the limitations of medical technology to enhance patients' end-of-life care; and limited reimbursement for hospital care when dying patients are not receiving active, life-prolonging treatment.

The booklet will answer many legal and ethical questions that arise among caregivers and patients. For more information, call Choice in Dying at 212-366-5540 or 800-989WILL.

10.3928/0098-9134-19950501-16

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