Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The Complete Care Plan Manual for Long-Term Care

Marlene S Blackford, MS, RN, CS

Abstract

The Complete Care Plan Manual for Long-Term Care March CS. Chicago: American Hospital Publishing, Inc., 1 992; 1 23 pages, $25.95 (AHA Member), $37.95 (NonMember), softcover.

Written by a master's prepared nurse, The Complete Care Plan Manual for LongTerm Care is specifically written in easy-to-understand terminology for nurses and other interdisciplinary team members in nursing facilities. The book includes an extensive introduction and 18 chapters that detail care planning specifics for functions that are required for everyday living, along with critical clinical conditions that are commonly observed in long-term care clients. The 18 chapters correspond to each of the Resident Assessment Protocols (RAPs) as created in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1987 for nursing facilities. They include such categories as cognitive loss/dementia; communication; ADL functional / rehabilitation potential; urinary continence and indwelling catheter, psychosocial well-being; behavior problems; nutritional status; psychotropic drug use; and physical restraints.

For each RAP, the manual guides care planners in naming the problems of the client; determining etiologies to be addressed; setting measurable goals; and planning approaches to meet the stated goals. The introduction identifies the components of a useful care plan and briefly describes the four steps in the care planning: assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating. Also included in the introduction is a step-by-step guide for using the manual as well as a case study and sample care plan.

The book is easy to read with care planning information categorized in clearly identified lists. It is designed to be read either as a whole, or by individual chapters as the care planning process of the specific client dictates. However, the introduction must be read to effectively use the manual when developing individual care plans. The importance of the introduction would lend itself to being designated as Chapter 1.

This book contains the most coherent, simplistic explanation of care planning of any book known to this reviewer. For this reason, it will be most helpful to the practitioner with limited knowledge of care planning. In addition, due to the extensive numbers of goah and approaches listed, the practitioner will save time in care planning because fewer resources will need to be consulted.

One weakness of the book is its title. The Complete Care Plan Manual for Long-Term Care sounds as though the book contains all the information needed to write a care plan for the long-term client. Consequently, I was disappointed when I opened the book and saw that it addressed only the RAPs that correspond with the Minimum Data Set (MDS). Certainly, a less extensive title would eliminate raising false expectations in potential purchasers. It would also have been helpful if the author had included a sample care plan detailing how to adapt the care planning process for specific clients when the problems/needs, goals, and approaches for a given situation are not listed.…

The Complete Care Plan Manual for Long-Term Care March CS. Chicago: American Hospital Publishing, Inc., 1 992; 1 23 pages, $25.95 (AHA Member), $37.95 (NonMember), softcover.

Written by a master's prepared nurse, The Complete Care Plan Manual for LongTerm Care is specifically written in easy-to-understand terminology for nurses and other interdisciplinary team members in nursing facilities. The book includes an extensive introduction and 18 chapters that detail care planning specifics for functions that are required for everyday living, along with critical clinical conditions that are commonly observed in long-term care clients. The 18 chapters correspond to each of the Resident Assessment Protocols (RAPs) as created in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1987 for nursing facilities. They include such categories as cognitive loss/dementia; communication; ADL functional / rehabilitation potential; urinary continence and indwelling catheter, psychosocial well-being; behavior problems; nutritional status; psychotropic drug use; and physical restraints.

For each RAP, the manual guides care planners in naming the problems of the client; determining etiologies to be addressed; setting measurable goals; and planning approaches to meet the stated goals. The introduction identifies the components of a useful care plan and briefly describes the four steps in the care planning: assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating. Also included in the introduction is a step-by-step guide for using the manual as well as a case study and sample care plan.

The book is easy to read with care planning information categorized in clearly identified lists. It is designed to be read either as a whole, or by individual chapters as the care planning process of the specific client dictates. However, the introduction must be read to effectively use the manual when developing individual care plans. The importance of the introduction would lend itself to being designated as Chapter 1.

This book contains the most coherent, simplistic explanation of care planning of any book known to this reviewer. For this reason, it will be most helpful to the practitioner with limited knowledge of care planning. In addition, due to the extensive numbers of goah and approaches listed, the practitioner will save time in care planning because fewer resources will need to be consulted.

One weakness of the book is its title. The Complete Care Plan Manual for Long-Term Care sounds as though the book contains all the information needed to write a care plan for the long-term client. Consequently, I was disappointed when I opened the book and saw that it addressed only the RAPs that correspond with the Minimum Data Set (MDS). Certainly, a less extensive title would eliminate raising false expectations in potential purchasers. It would also have been helpful if the author had included a sample care plan detailing how to adapt the care planning process for specific clients when the problems/needs, goals, and approaches for a given situation are not listed.

10.3928/0098-9134-19940201-13

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