Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Between Home and Nursing Home: The Board and Care Alternative

Margaret D Cohn, RN, PhD

Abstract

Between Home and Nursing Home: The Board and Care Alternative. Down IM, Schnurr L Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1991, 21 9 pages, hardcover, $1 8.95; softcover, $1 3.95.

Personal care. . . elder foster care. . . residential care. . . adult homes . . . board and care. . . . No matter what it's called, there is an increasing demand for supervised, safe, affordable alternative living arrangements for elders who are unable to live alone, but do not yet require all the costly options of a skilled nursing facility. In an era when enormous attention has been focused on staff development to improve nursing home services, it is time to consider ways to assess and ensure the quality of life, longevity, and health of older adults through alternative facilities.

This volume provides a wide range of information - covering who is eligible for board and care, who offers such services, as well as what constitutes effective organization and programming of activities for residents in these usually small facilities. After the first two chapters, which describe the background and case management needs of board and care facilities, the greater part of the volume is devoted to practical suggestions and resources for meeting resident needs. Detailed attention is offered to sensory deprivation, memory loss, and mental and spiritual health.

The authors emphasize ways to stimulate all appetites - food, communication, interaction, thought, and creativity. For example, there is a wealth of tips on enhancing the desirability of food (not the nutritional value). Chapters on art therapy, music therapy, and physical exercise offer concrete suggestions for engaging and promoting optimal individual functioning.

This volume appears to be most useful to operators and professionals in board and care facilities where a wide range of "specialists" is not available; guidance in various therapeutic skills can provide ideas and techniques to be adopted. Resources offered in the book include tips on managing healing and memory deficits, outlines for worship services, descriptions of full range-ofmotion chair exercise programs, and appendices of all state Ombudsman programs overseeing concerns or conflicts in board and care facilities. Both nurses and consumers are offered - in an immediate and comprehensive style - much practical information about ways services can be structured.

Both professionals and families seeking to understand the provisions of a quality residential facility will find this volume readable and highly informative.…

Between Home and Nursing Home: The Board and Care Alternative. Down IM, Schnurr L Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1991, 21 9 pages, hardcover, $1 8.95; softcover, $1 3.95.

Personal care. . . elder foster care. . . residential care. . . adult homes . . . board and care. . . . No matter what it's called, there is an increasing demand for supervised, safe, affordable alternative living arrangements for elders who are unable to live alone, but do not yet require all the costly options of a skilled nursing facility. In an era when enormous attention has been focused on staff development to improve nursing home services, it is time to consider ways to assess and ensure the quality of life, longevity, and health of older adults through alternative facilities.

This volume provides a wide range of information - covering who is eligible for board and care, who offers such services, as well as what constitutes effective organization and programming of activities for residents in these usually small facilities. After the first two chapters, which describe the background and case management needs of board and care facilities, the greater part of the volume is devoted to practical suggestions and resources for meeting resident needs. Detailed attention is offered to sensory deprivation, memory loss, and mental and spiritual health.

The authors emphasize ways to stimulate all appetites - food, communication, interaction, thought, and creativity. For example, there is a wealth of tips on enhancing the desirability of food (not the nutritional value). Chapters on art therapy, music therapy, and physical exercise offer concrete suggestions for engaging and promoting optimal individual functioning.

This volume appears to be most useful to operators and professionals in board and care facilities where a wide range of "specialists" is not available; guidance in various therapeutic skills can provide ideas and techniques to be adopted. Resources offered in the book include tips on managing healing and memory deficits, outlines for worship services, descriptions of full range-ofmotion chair exercise programs, and appendices of all state Ombudsman programs overseeing concerns or conflicts in board and care facilities. Both nurses and consumers are offered - in an immediate and comprehensive style - much practical information about ways services can be structured.

Both professionals and families seeking to understand the provisions of a quality residential facility will find this volume readable and highly informative.

10.3928/0098-9134-19930301-13

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents