Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The Path We Tread: Blacks in Nursing 1854-1990

Michelle Griffin, RNC, MSN

Abstract

The Path We Tread: Blacks in Nursing 1854-1990. Carnegie, M.E. New York: National League for Nursing, 1991; 301 pages, paperbound.

This publication provides an insightful resource for exploring the historical role of black women in nursing. This insight, analyzed against the historical backdrop described, makes for informative reading.

The book emphasizes the role black women played between 1854 and 1990; their role is particularly illuminating in the light of significant challenges these women and nurses faced. Through this emphasis, the reader is brought to an understanding of the progress made in the nursing profession through the efforts of black women.

One difficulty I encountered was sorting out an individual's contribution in the context of the historic and organizational events. Because the author uses a narrative form to weave the women's roles into the events, the book demands a second reading. However, the difficulty in understanding the chronology is overcome by a second reading and by referring to the chronology found in the appendix.

Overall, this publication entices the reader to further investigate not only the role of the black nurse, but also that of all women in the profession of nursing. This enticement provides a compelling reason for recommending this publication as a "must read."…

The Path We Tread: Blacks in Nursing 1854-1990. Carnegie, M.E. New York: National League for Nursing, 1991; 301 pages, paperbound.

This publication provides an insightful resource for exploring the historical role of black women in nursing. This insight, analyzed against the historical backdrop described, makes for informative reading.

The book emphasizes the role black women played between 1854 and 1990; their role is particularly illuminating in the light of significant challenges these women and nurses faced. Through this emphasis, the reader is brought to an understanding of the progress made in the nursing profession through the efforts of black women.

One difficulty I encountered was sorting out an individual's contribution in the context of the historic and organizational events. Because the author uses a narrative form to weave the women's roles into the events, the book demands a second reading. However, the difficulty in understanding the chronology is overcome by a second reading and by referring to the chronology found in the appendix.

Overall, this publication entices the reader to further investigate not only the role of the black nurse, but also that of all women in the profession of nursing. This enticement provides a compelling reason for recommending this publication as a "must read."

10.3928/0098-9134-19931101-11

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