Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Facilitating 5.0-Care Practices in tie. Elderly.

Cindy Nissen, RN, C, MSN

Abstract

Facilitating Self-Care Practices In ffce E/cferfy.

Horn BJ (ed), New York, Haworth Press, 1 990, 1 84 pages, hardcover.

This book is the result of a 3-year Elderly Home Care Project conducted by investigators at the University of Washington.

The goals for the project were two-fold: to identify clinical problems experienced by acutely ill older adults who are homebound, and to develop management strategies for the identified clinical problems. One hundred seventy-eight home health agencies participated in the problem identification process. The top nine problems identified included teaching about medications and IV therapies, and teaching about the care of wounds and diabetes. Other areas revolved around nursing management of older adult/family coping problems, nursing management of IV therapies, and wounds and symptom management for patients with cancer. The top three problems (medication regimens, teaching the older client, and family coping problems) were described in this volume.

Edited by the project's principal investigator, each chapter was authored by University of Washington faculty members who collaborated with practitioners and teachers in the home health field. For the identified clinical problems, the reader is provided with an integrated literature review of research and practice, clinical assessment tools, and practical intervention strategies. The comprehensive medication assessment and the caregiver assessment and planning guide are quite useful.

Nurses in all settings are challenged to find and refine effective teaching and intervention strategies for their clients. Although the book specifically mentions home care, the concepts explored can be used in a variety of settings and, with slight modifications, for any aged client. Additional investigated clinical problems will be published in Home Health Care Services Quarterly. Each will be a welcome addition in assisting healthcare professionals meet the challenge of facilitating selfcare practices for clients and caregivers.…

Facilitating Self-Care Practices In ffce E/cferfy.

Horn BJ (ed), New York, Haworth Press, 1 990, 1 84 pages, hardcover.

This book is the result of a 3-year Elderly Home Care Project conducted by investigators at the University of Washington.

The goals for the project were two-fold: to identify clinical problems experienced by acutely ill older adults who are homebound, and to develop management strategies for the identified clinical problems. One hundred seventy-eight home health agencies participated in the problem identification process. The top nine problems identified included teaching about medications and IV therapies, and teaching about the care of wounds and diabetes. Other areas revolved around nursing management of older adult/family coping problems, nursing management of IV therapies, and wounds and symptom management for patients with cancer. The top three problems (medication regimens, teaching the older client, and family coping problems) were described in this volume.

Edited by the project's principal investigator, each chapter was authored by University of Washington faculty members who collaborated with practitioners and teachers in the home health field. For the identified clinical problems, the reader is provided with an integrated literature review of research and practice, clinical assessment tools, and practical intervention strategies. The comprehensive medication assessment and the caregiver assessment and planning guide are quite useful.

Nurses in all settings are challenged to find and refine effective teaching and intervention strategies for their clients. Although the book specifically mentions home care, the concepts explored can be used in a variety of settings and, with slight modifications, for any aged client. Additional investigated clinical problems will be published in Home Health Care Services Quarterly. Each will be a welcome addition in assisting healthcare professionals meet the challenge of facilitating selfcare practices for clients and caregivers.

10.3928/0098-9134-19920701-15

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