Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Rehabilitation/Restorative Care in the Community

Joan Bezon, MS, RN, C

Abstract

Rehabilitation/Restorative Care in the Community. Hoeman SP, St. Louis, Mo, CV Mosby Co, 1 990, 357 pages, softcover.

This book is written to improve the daily care and qual ity of I ife for persons with chronic or disabling conditions who live in the community. The authors suggest that this book builds on basic text materials so that caregivers can assist with tasks and procedures under direction and supervision of a nurse supervisor, and that it is not intended to be a basic text for nurse's aides. Unfortunately, the authors do not clarify who the individuals are who give the care. The reader is left wondering if the caregivers are nurse's aides who are taking an advanced course, or are they family members who are being taught to give care?

The book is well-written, with each chapter starting with objectives and an overview. All chapters focus on the client as an individual and offer considerations for making the client an active partner in the activity and promoting client control of the situation. Boxes highlight key material and pictures demonstrate equipment and activities. Skin care and the prevention of pressure sores by positioning were interspersed throughout the book. It was disappointing not to find the semiprone position emphasized as a deterrent of pressure sores.

The chapter on bowel and bladder function was well done, especially the procedure for application of condom catheters. Turning, moving, and positioning was clearly detailed with pictures showing every step needed for a safe and successful transfer. I question the choice of words in the section dealing with care for the client who has had a stroke. There were medical terms that are difficult to pronounce and understand at the nurse's aide or family caregiver level. It would have helped to have definitions and pronunciation given in the text or perhaps use fewer medical terms. The section on diabetes demonstrated boiling syringes and testing urine; these are outdated procedures and could have been eliminated. The appendices were wonderful, with explicit pictures and text that dealt with traveling with a disability, diet, range of motion exercise, and a glossary of terms.

Rehabilitation/Restorative Care in the Community offers a clearly delineated program to provide care for the disabled who live in the community. It would be useful for those caring for the disabled in any setting. The reading and comprehension levels may be too high for most nurse's aides or family caregivers, yet it might be valuable if used in conjunction with teaching by a professional nurse.…

Rehabilitation/Restorative Care in the Community. Hoeman SP, St. Louis, Mo, CV Mosby Co, 1 990, 357 pages, softcover.

This book is written to improve the daily care and qual ity of I ife for persons with chronic or disabling conditions who live in the community. The authors suggest that this book builds on basic text materials so that caregivers can assist with tasks and procedures under direction and supervision of a nurse supervisor, and that it is not intended to be a basic text for nurse's aides. Unfortunately, the authors do not clarify who the individuals are who give the care. The reader is left wondering if the caregivers are nurse's aides who are taking an advanced course, or are they family members who are being taught to give care?

The book is well-written, with each chapter starting with objectives and an overview. All chapters focus on the client as an individual and offer considerations for making the client an active partner in the activity and promoting client control of the situation. Boxes highlight key material and pictures demonstrate equipment and activities. Skin care and the prevention of pressure sores by positioning were interspersed throughout the book. It was disappointing not to find the semiprone position emphasized as a deterrent of pressure sores.

The chapter on bowel and bladder function was well done, especially the procedure for application of condom catheters. Turning, moving, and positioning was clearly detailed with pictures showing every step needed for a safe and successful transfer. I question the choice of words in the section dealing with care for the client who has had a stroke. There were medical terms that are difficult to pronounce and understand at the nurse's aide or family caregiver level. It would have helped to have definitions and pronunciation given in the text or perhaps use fewer medical terms. The section on diabetes demonstrated boiling syringes and testing urine; these are outdated procedures and could have been eliminated. The appendices were wonderful, with explicit pictures and text that dealt with traveling with a disability, diet, range of motion exercise, and a glossary of terms.

Rehabilitation/Restorative Care in the Community offers a clearly delineated program to provide care for the disabled who live in the community. It would be useful for those caring for the disabled in any setting. The reading and comprehension levels may be too high for most nurse's aides or family caregivers, yet it might be valuable if used in conjunction with teaching by a professional nurse.

10.3928/0098-9134-19910701-17

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