Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Into Aging

Rinda Alexander, PhD, RN

Abstract

Into Aging. Dempsey S, Hoffman L, Huffman TL, Thorofare, NJ, Slack, Inc, 1991 , simulation game, $44.

Into Aging is a well-developed simulation game that serves as both a teaching strategy and as a sensitizaron process for players who are concerned with the issues and problems of aging. The game confronts all the feelings experienced by those who are aging - fear, anger, depression, helplessness, and hopelessness. Through case samples and selfawareness exercises, the authors challenge readers to re-think their beliefs about aging. A more positive approach to aging is a natural outcome of playing the game.

The second edition of Into Aging implements some changes that make the game better than before. For example, the focus is now a station format as opposed to a board format. This change provides players with the opportunity for much more interaction than previously. Rve to fifteen players may play at one time and approximately an hour is needed to complete a game.

The appendices contain a list of items needed at each of the three tables and at the Identity Table. In the second edition, a prepared information folder for each table is provided. This is of great value when preparing to play the game.

The objectives for playing are to: gain awareness of the challenges of late adulthood; gain empathy and insight into the problems of late adulthood; develop a more positive orientation and view of aging; and develop strategies for change on a personal and societal level that will have a positive impact on aging.

Providing debriefing time is vital to a positive outcome for players. The thirty minutes allowed for fewer players certainly needs to be increased when more people are playing.

Into Aging is an excellent vehicle for teaching concepts and concerns about aging. Thorough directions are provided for the game along with well thought out objectives.

This second edition is highly recommended as a teaching tool for all healthcare professionals, families, and individuals who are concerned with the aging process. Playing the game is not always fun, but for those who do not "fudge" and fully enter into the process, the rewards are great.…

Into Aging. Dempsey S, Hoffman L, Huffman TL, Thorofare, NJ, Slack, Inc, 1991 , simulation game, $44.

Into Aging is a well-developed simulation game that serves as both a teaching strategy and as a sensitizaron process for players who are concerned with the issues and problems of aging. The game confronts all the feelings experienced by those who are aging - fear, anger, depression, helplessness, and hopelessness. Through case samples and selfawareness exercises, the authors challenge readers to re-think their beliefs about aging. A more positive approach to aging is a natural outcome of playing the game.

The second edition of Into Aging implements some changes that make the game better than before. For example, the focus is now a station format as opposed to a board format. This change provides players with the opportunity for much more interaction than previously. Rve to fifteen players may play at one time and approximately an hour is needed to complete a game.

The appendices contain a list of items needed at each of the three tables and at the Identity Table. In the second edition, a prepared information folder for each table is provided. This is of great value when preparing to play the game.

The objectives for playing are to: gain awareness of the challenges of late adulthood; gain empathy and insight into the problems of late adulthood; develop a more positive orientation and view of aging; and develop strategies for change on a personal and societal level that will have a positive impact on aging.

Providing debriefing time is vital to a positive outcome for players. The thirty minutes allowed for fewer players certainly needs to be increased when more people are playing.

Into Aging is an excellent vehicle for teaching concepts and concerns about aging. Thorough directions are provided for the game along with well thought out objectives.

This second edition is highly recommended as a teaching tool for all healthcare professionals, families, and individuals who are concerned with the aging process. Playing the game is not always fun, but for those who do not "fudge" and fully enter into the process, the rewards are great.

10.3928/0098-9134-19910701-14

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