Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Nursing Care Planning Guides for Long-Term Care, 3rd ed.

Judith E Moffett, RNC, MS

Abstract

Nursing Care Planning Guides for Long-Term Care, 3rd ed. Eliopoulos C Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1990, 282 pages, softcover.

This third edition uses a nursing diagnosis approach to care planning. The guides are in two sections: medical and mental/behavioral. The medical section is based primarily on disease conditions, with a few functional problems, such as urinary incontinence and sensory impairments. Although the diseases are common to long-term care, the reference might be more useful if it were organized by functional deficits. The mental/ behavioral section is less diseaseoriented.

Each problem section contains a brief overview of the problem or disease. Pertinent history and physical findings, when applicable, are discussed, along with a long-term goal. One or more common nursing diagnoses are then presented, with a rationale for each diagnosis. A goal, approaches, and desired outcomes follow.

The nursing diagnoses, goals, and approaches are at a basic level. This reference book could be useful for the nurse that is new to long-term care, or as a refresher for a nurse returning to practice.

The mental/behavioral section covers such problem areas as body image disturbance, anger, dependency, fear, grief, and depression. This section may be more useful than the medical section because it addresses problems essential to long-term care, but that have traditionally received less systematic care planning by the nurse.

A nursing process appendix provides a concise reference on physical assessment techniques and appropriate recording of findings, assessment of risk for pressure sores, mental status assessment with examples of abnormal findings, a listing of NANDA-approved nursing diagnoses, and a guide for client teaching. Other appendices include one on rehabilitative nursing skills, principles and procedures for using common appliances, nutrition, and medications. These appendices add to its value as a reference, although some of them will quickly become outdated, such as those on drugs and approved diagnoses.

I object to the use of the term "patient" throughout the book. Because much of long-term care is in the home, community, or nursing home, "client" or "person" would be a more acceptable term.

The editor had contributed much to the written body of knowledge of gerontological nursing. Although this publication does not add to that knowledge, it does collect basic information into a usable format.…

Nursing Care Planning Guides for Long-Term Care, 3rd ed. Eliopoulos C Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1990, 282 pages, softcover.

This third edition uses a nursing diagnosis approach to care planning. The guides are in two sections: medical and mental/behavioral. The medical section is based primarily on disease conditions, with a few functional problems, such as urinary incontinence and sensory impairments. Although the diseases are common to long-term care, the reference might be more useful if it were organized by functional deficits. The mental/ behavioral section is less diseaseoriented.

Each problem section contains a brief overview of the problem or disease. Pertinent history and physical findings, when applicable, are discussed, along with a long-term goal. One or more common nursing diagnoses are then presented, with a rationale for each diagnosis. A goal, approaches, and desired outcomes follow.

The nursing diagnoses, goals, and approaches are at a basic level. This reference book could be useful for the nurse that is new to long-term care, or as a refresher for a nurse returning to practice.

The mental/behavioral section covers such problem areas as body image disturbance, anger, dependency, fear, grief, and depression. This section may be more useful than the medical section because it addresses problems essential to long-term care, but that have traditionally received less systematic care planning by the nurse.

A nursing process appendix provides a concise reference on physical assessment techniques and appropriate recording of findings, assessment of risk for pressure sores, mental status assessment with examples of abnormal findings, a listing of NANDA-approved nursing diagnoses, and a guide for client teaching. Other appendices include one on rehabilitative nursing skills, principles and procedures for using common appliances, nutrition, and medications. These appendices add to its value as a reference, although some of them will quickly become outdated, such as those on drugs and approved diagnoses.

I object to the use of the term "patient" throughout the book. Because much of long-term care is in the home, community, or nursing home, "client" or "person" would be a more acceptable term.

The editor had contributed much to the written body of knowledge of gerontological nursing. Although this publication does not add to that knowledge, it does collect basic information into a usable format.

10.3928/0098-9134-19910101-24

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