Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The Milwaukee Evaluation of Daily Living Skills

Rinda Alexander

Abstract

The Milwaukee Evaluation of Daily Living Skills. Leonardelli CA, Thorofare, NJ, SLACK, Inc, 1988, 84 pages, softcover.

The Milwaukee Evaluation of Daily Living Skills (MEDLS) is aptly named. It provides practical guidelines for assessing the behavior of the long-term psychiatric client. The author's intent is to develop a behavioral assessment of skills required for daily living from the perspective of both the chronically mentally ill and the students.

The clinical purpose is to provide standard, objective, quantitative measures that are sensitive to treatment effects and that are fairly easy to use. The measures are designed to elicit baseline data that can be used to establish treatment objectives for specific clients. The target population is adults 1 8 years old and older who have had a history of mental illness for 2 or more years, and who have been hospitalized in either a skilled care or community-based facility for a consecutive period of 6 months during that time.

The book appropriately progresses from considerations in instrument design to application and limitations of the MEDLS. Validity procedures are discussed.

A series of 20 subtests for daily living skills has been developed in areas such as communication, bathing, dressing, eating, clothing maintenance, medication management, and personal health.

Screening and reporting forms that can be easily understood by all of the interdisciplinary team members are included. Administrative procedures for the MEDLS are clearly outlined. It is stressed that the MfZDLS is just one aspect of total client assessment and should be used iri conjunction with other assessment methodologies.

The book is written for maximal practical application and provides an appropriate supplemental assessment for daily living skills needed by the client in long-term psychiatric care. It is of concern, however, that validity procedures are based on a very small sample size and that the sample consisted of only men. It is important that validity procedures continue on the MEDLS. Overall, this book provides practical assessment guidelines for psychiatric clients in the long-term setting.…

The Milwaukee Evaluation of Daily Living Skills. Leonardelli CA, Thorofare, NJ, SLACK, Inc, 1988, 84 pages, softcover.

The Milwaukee Evaluation of Daily Living Skills (MEDLS) is aptly named. It provides practical guidelines for assessing the behavior of the long-term psychiatric client. The author's intent is to develop a behavioral assessment of skills required for daily living from the perspective of both the chronically mentally ill and the students.

The clinical purpose is to provide standard, objective, quantitative measures that are sensitive to treatment effects and that are fairly easy to use. The measures are designed to elicit baseline data that can be used to establish treatment objectives for specific clients. The target population is adults 1 8 years old and older who have had a history of mental illness for 2 or more years, and who have been hospitalized in either a skilled care or community-based facility for a consecutive period of 6 months during that time.

The book appropriately progresses from considerations in instrument design to application and limitations of the MEDLS. Validity procedures are discussed.

A series of 20 subtests for daily living skills has been developed in areas such as communication, bathing, dressing, eating, clothing maintenance, medication management, and personal health.

Screening and reporting forms that can be easily understood by all of the interdisciplinary team members are included. Administrative procedures for the MEDLS are clearly outlined. It is stressed that the MfZDLS is just one aspect of total client assessment and should be used iri conjunction with other assessment methodologies.

The book is written for maximal practical application and provides an appropriate supplemental assessment for daily living skills needed by the client in long-term psychiatric care. It is of concern, however, that validity procedures are based on a very small sample size and that the sample consisted of only men. It is important that validity procedures continue on the MEDLS. Overall, this book provides practical assessment guidelines for psychiatric clients in the long-term setting.

10.3928/0098-9134-19910101-22

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