Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Nursing Care of the Older Adult

Diane L Myers, MS, RN, C

Abstract

Nursing Care of the Older Adult, 2nd ed. Hogstel MO (Ed), New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1988, 566 pages, softcover.

In the dynamic field of gerontological nursing, this second edition of a gerontological text reflects the changes and growth of the knowledge base in updated and expanded chapters and the addition of new chapters. One of its outstanding features is its attention to nursing interventions for the older adult in such specialized settings as hospital, emergency, perioperative, critical, and home care - areas not typically addressed as thoroughly in other texts. Especially beneficial is the section on external resources, which includes chapters on both community and governmental resources that provide practical information to aid the gerontological nurse in the role of patient advocate.

Another of its strengths is its coverage of mental health problems in older adults. Particularly well-covered are the issues of depression, loneliness, and character and psychosexual disorders. The area of dementia is covered less thoroughly. A number of assessment tools are included throughout the book that readers are encouraged to use and evaluate. The editor's concluding comments raise salient questions for further research and publication.

Each chapter contains a well-organized narrative, and the use of tables and figures is not excessive. Study questions at the end of each chapter guide readers through a content review. Reference and bibliography lists that follow the study questions are both current and extensive.

Although the text is purported to be useful for undergraduate and graduate gerontological nursing students, as well as for practicing nurses in various settings and roles, perhaps it will be most beneficial to graduate nurses specializing in gerontology and to practicing gerontological nurses. Although the basic topics of age-related developmental, physiological, and psychological changes along with general nursing assessments and interventions are adequately addressed, the book's greatest strength lies in its exceptional attention to the more extensive issues of advanced gerontological nursing practice.…

Nursing Care of the Older Adult, 2nd ed. Hogstel MO (Ed), New York, John Wiley and Sons, 1988, 566 pages, softcover.

In the dynamic field of gerontological nursing, this second edition of a gerontological text reflects the changes and growth of the knowledge base in updated and expanded chapters and the addition of new chapters. One of its outstanding features is its attention to nursing interventions for the older adult in such specialized settings as hospital, emergency, perioperative, critical, and home care - areas not typically addressed as thoroughly in other texts. Especially beneficial is the section on external resources, which includes chapters on both community and governmental resources that provide practical information to aid the gerontological nurse in the role of patient advocate.

Another of its strengths is its coverage of mental health problems in older adults. Particularly well-covered are the issues of depression, loneliness, and character and psychosexual disorders. The area of dementia is covered less thoroughly. A number of assessment tools are included throughout the book that readers are encouraged to use and evaluate. The editor's concluding comments raise salient questions for further research and publication.

Each chapter contains a well-organized narrative, and the use of tables and figures is not excessive. Study questions at the end of each chapter guide readers through a content review. Reference and bibliography lists that follow the study questions are both current and extensive.

Although the text is purported to be useful for undergraduate and graduate gerontological nursing students, as well as for practicing nurses in various settings and roles, perhaps it will be most beneficial to graduate nurses specializing in gerontology and to practicing gerontological nurses. Although the basic topics of age-related developmental, physiological, and psychological changes along with general nursing assessments and interventions are adequately addressed, the book's greatest strength lies in its exceptional attention to the more extensive issues of advanced gerontological nursing practice.

10.3928/0098-9134-19900601-13

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