Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Osteoporosis: A Guide to Prevention and Treatment

Eugenia M Mills, MSN, RN, C

Abstract

Osteoporosis: A Guide to Prevention and Treatment, John F. Aloia, Champaign, lit, Leisure Press, 1989, 236 pages, $1 2.95, paperbound.

Written by a physician, this book is a comprehensive review of the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The writing style requires an educated reader, but the reader does not need a medical background. The author has been careful noi only to define medical terms in the narrative, but also to supply a glossary of terms in the appendix.

There are 13 chapters that cover osteoporosis and calcium, the skeletal system and osteoporosis, osteoporosis risk factors, avoiding osteoporotic injuries, prevention of osteoporosis through proper nutrition, the estrogen controversy, exercise, diagnostic testing, rehabilitative strategies, pain management, drag therapy for osteoporosis, and future hope.

The author addresses several topics that are especially interesting, such as the estrogen controversy, the calcium craze, and exercise. In the chapter on exercise, the author recommends several exercises to help prevent loss of calcium from the bones with helpful diagrams on how to carry-out the exercises.

In the chapter on the calcium craze, the author addresses the idea that women need more calcium than had been previously thought. He discusses the various calcium supplements that are on the market and recommends obtaining calcium through food sources: "Calcium is not a miracle mineral. It is not as effective as estrogen in preventing postmenopausal bone loss."

In the chapter on the estrogen controversy, the author addresses the benefits and problems of taking estrogen postmenopause. He also discusses the conservative versus aggressive approaches to estrogen therapy and the various forms of estrogen/progestin available. He points out that estrogen therapy in the postmenopausal woman decreases bone loss and may also protect against coronary artery disease. However, estrogen therapy increases the risk for certain types of cancer.

The author urges all postmenopausal women get adequate calcium, exercise, and participate in health promotion activities as prophylaxis against osteoporosis.

This is a book that should be read by all women of all ages. It offers many suggestions for putting one a! decreased risk for osteoporosis, and it is a helpful resource book for women who have osteoporosis.…

Osteoporosis: A Guide to Prevention and Treatment, John F. Aloia, Champaign, lit, Leisure Press, 1989, 236 pages, $1 2.95, paperbound.

Written by a physician, this book is a comprehensive review of the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The writing style requires an educated reader, but the reader does not need a medical background. The author has been careful noi only to define medical terms in the narrative, but also to supply a glossary of terms in the appendix.

There are 13 chapters that cover osteoporosis and calcium, the skeletal system and osteoporosis, osteoporosis risk factors, avoiding osteoporotic injuries, prevention of osteoporosis through proper nutrition, the estrogen controversy, exercise, diagnostic testing, rehabilitative strategies, pain management, drag therapy for osteoporosis, and future hope.

The author addresses several topics that are especially interesting, such as the estrogen controversy, the calcium craze, and exercise. In the chapter on exercise, the author recommends several exercises to help prevent loss of calcium from the bones with helpful diagrams on how to carry-out the exercises.

In the chapter on the calcium craze, the author addresses the idea that women need more calcium than had been previously thought. He discusses the various calcium supplements that are on the market and recommends obtaining calcium through food sources: "Calcium is not a miracle mineral. It is not as effective as estrogen in preventing postmenopausal bone loss."

In the chapter on the estrogen controversy, the author addresses the benefits and problems of taking estrogen postmenopause. He also discusses the conservative versus aggressive approaches to estrogen therapy and the various forms of estrogen/progestin available. He points out that estrogen therapy in the postmenopausal woman decreases bone loss and may also protect against coronary artery disease. However, estrogen therapy increases the risk for certain types of cancer.

The author urges all postmenopausal women get adequate calcium, exercise, and participate in health promotion activities as prophylaxis against osteoporosis.

This is a book that should be read by all women of all ages. It offers many suggestions for putting one a! decreased risk for osteoporosis, and it is a helpful resource book for women who have osteoporosis.

10.3928/0098-9134-19900401-14

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