Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Retirement Housing: A Step-by-Step Approach

Dolores M Alford, PhD, RN, FAAN

Abstract

Retirement Housing: A Step-by-Step Approach. Laughlin JL, Moseley SK, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1 989, 334 pages, hardcover.

Why would gerontological nurses be interested in developing and managing retirement housing? That is the focus of this excellent, well-written, and timely guide to housing for retired older persons. Every nurse in this specialty should be knowledgeable about what it takes to produce the various kinds of retirement housing. For example, nurses might want to be the investors, the venture capitalists, or they might even serve on civic or church committees proposing retirement housing. This book is must reading for the gerontic clinical nurse specialist/ consultant who is called on to provide nursing expertise to developers of retirement housing.

Chapters include the planning process, product analysis and assessment, financial feasibility, legal implications, and marketing and sales, as well as operations and financial management. The book is easy to read and the topical outline and discussion are easy to follow. The authors define their terms well, explain their topics with realistic examples, give lists of what should go into each phase of the process, and provide excellent tables, especially on budgets and financial statements.

Throughout the developing process, the authors urge and promote ethical behaviors toward the elderly seeking to meet their varied housing needs. The authors compassionately demonstrate how gerontological principles must be used in communicating and dealing with the elderly. For example, functional levels rather than age are used to describe special needs and services. Aging in place is discussed as a concept that influences how services and needs must be met in senior housing.

The authors also recommend having a "licensed" nurse in retirement housing to give tenants a "sense of security" and to "establish wellness programs and interface with the medical community." The authors would do better to specifically state that the nurse should be a "registered" nurse with expertise in gerontic nursing and wellness concepts.…

Retirement Housing: A Step-by-Step Approach. Laughlin JL, Moseley SK, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1 989, 334 pages, hardcover.

Why would gerontological nurses be interested in developing and managing retirement housing? That is the focus of this excellent, well-written, and timely guide to housing for retired older persons. Every nurse in this specialty should be knowledgeable about what it takes to produce the various kinds of retirement housing. For example, nurses might want to be the investors, the venture capitalists, or they might even serve on civic or church committees proposing retirement housing. This book is must reading for the gerontic clinical nurse specialist/ consultant who is called on to provide nursing expertise to developers of retirement housing.

Chapters include the planning process, product analysis and assessment, financial feasibility, legal implications, and marketing and sales, as well as operations and financial management. The book is easy to read and the topical outline and discussion are easy to follow. The authors define their terms well, explain their topics with realistic examples, give lists of what should go into each phase of the process, and provide excellent tables, especially on budgets and financial statements.

Throughout the developing process, the authors urge and promote ethical behaviors toward the elderly seeking to meet their varied housing needs. The authors compassionately demonstrate how gerontological principles must be used in communicating and dealing with the elderly. For example, functional levels rather than age are used to describe special needs and services. Aging in place is discussed as a concept that influences how services and needs must be met in senior housing.

The authors also recommend having a "licensed" nurse in retirement housing to give tenants a "sense of security" and to "establish wellness programs and interface with the medical community." The authors would do better to specifically state that the nurse should be a "registered" nurse with expertise in gerontic nursing and wellness concepts.

10.3928/0098-9134-19901001-12

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