Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Asepsis, the Right Touch: Something Old is Now New

Doris F Chisholm, RN, MEd, CNA

Abstract

Asepsis, the Right Touch: Something Old is Now New. Crow S, Bossier City, La, The Everett Companies, 1989, 196 pages, hardbound.

Hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection represents an increasingly important concern for nurses in clinical, administrative, research, and educational roles. Although an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly, a practical, commonsense approach to infection control practice has been overshadowed by the technological advances in modern health care. For two decades, Crow has been teaching health-care workers how to "first, do no harm" in the realm of infection prevention and control. These words, voiced years before infection control became a necessary priority in the face of the AIDS epidemic, have challenged many to re-examine their commitment to personal accountability in patient care.

Amusing anecdotes and classic quotes create a lasting impression that debunks infection control myths. Infectious disease theory is simplified and readers are urged to rediscover the basics^ - handwashing, the chain of infecion, principles of medicai asepsis, Ceners for Disease Control guidelines, and seeing microorganisms with the mind's eye, emphasizing that "the best quaranine is hygiene."

The material on surgical asepsis is with the increase in surgical procedures being performed outside the operating room. The book stresses that surgical asepsis requires the highest level of aseptic technique and balances the need for common sense with a need for more clinical studies to substantiate many of our infection control practices.

The concluding chapter, "101 to Save Money with Asepsis - Let Us Count the Ways," is invaluable to nurse managers. It challenges the reader to replace rituals with reason and rational thinking backed by scientific eviThe summary and suggested reading lists at the end of each chapter provide further direction for empowering through knowledge.…

Asepsis, the Right Touch: Something Old is Now New. Crow S, Bossier City, La, The Everett Companies, 1989, 196 pages, hardbound.

Hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection represents an increasingly important concern for nurses in clinical, administrative, research, and educational roles. Although an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly, a practical, commonsense approach to infection control practice has been overshadowed by the technological advances in modern health care. For two decades, Crow has been teaching health-care workers how to "first, do no harm" in the realm of infection prevention and control. These words, voiced years before infection control became a necessary priority in the face of the AIDS epidemic, have challenged many to re-examine their commitment to personal accountability in patient care.

Amusing anecdotes and classic quotes create a lasting impression that debunks infection control myths. Infectious disease theory is simplified and readers are urged to rediscover the basics^ - handwashing, the chain of infecion, principles of medicai asepsis, Ceners for Disease Control guidelines, and seeing microorganisms with the mind's eye, emphasizing that "the best quaranine is hygiene."

The material on surgical asepsis is with the increase in surgical procedures being performed outside the operating room. The book stresses that surgical asepsis requires the highest level of aseptic technique and balances the need for common sense with a need for more clinical studies to substantiate many of our infection control practices.

The concluding chapter, "101 to Save Money with Asepsis - Let Us Count the Ways," is invaluable to nurse managers. It challenges the reader to replace rituals with reason and rational thinking backed by scientific eviThe summary and suggested reading lists at the end of each chapter provide further direction for empowering through knowledge.

10.3928/0098-9134-19901001-14

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