Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

On Our Own: Independent Living for Older Persons

Janet A Moll, MS, RN, GNP

Abstract

On Our Own: Independent Living for Older Persons. Falk UA, New York, Prometheus Books, 1989, 159 pages, $10.95, paperback.

On Our Own explores the challenge of maintaining independence as one ages, is widowed, or faces physical or emotional problems. The author frequently uses vignettes to illustrate certain topics. The information is presented in a readable, positive manner.

Chapters include a review of the physical, social, and mental challenges of aging; options for housing and living arrangements; common age-related problems and how to promote healthy aging; ways to continue to grow as one ages; and examples of services available to assist older persons.

The book describes the health professionals trained to assist older persons, emphasizing the need for the physicians caring for older persons to have geriatric training. The author should make the same demand of nurses caring for older persons, whether registered nurses or nurse practitioners.

This book would be good reading for nursing students in associate degree or licensed vocational programs. The book is written so that children of aging parents or older persons themselves will find it helpful reading and refer to it often. Especially insightful is a chapter on "Do's and Don'ts" written for both older persons who are single again and family members.…

On Our Own: Independent Living for Older Persons. Falk UA, New York, Prometheus Books, 1989, 159 pages, $10.95, paperback.

On Our Own explores the challenge of maintaining independence as one ages, is widowed, or faces physical or emotional problems. The author frequently uses vignettes to illustrate certain topics. The information is presented in a readable, positive manner.

Chapters include a review of the physical, social, and mental challenges of aging; options for housing and living arrangements; common age-related problems and how to promote healthy aging; ways to continue to grow as one ages; and examples of services available to assist older persons.

The book describes the health professionals trained to assist older persons, emphasizing the need for the physicians caring for older persons to have geriatric training. The author should make the same demand of nurses caring for older persons, whether registered nurses or nurse practitioners.

This book would be good reading for nursing students in associate degree or licensed vocational programs. The book is written so that children of aging parents or older persons themselves will find it helpful reading and refer to it often. Especially insightful is a chapter on "Do's and Don'ts" written for both older persons who are single again and family members.

10.3928/0098-9134-19901001-13

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