Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Gerontological Nursing

Eugenia M Mills, MSN, RNC

Abstract

Gerontological Nursing. Eliopoulos C. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Company, 1987, 489 pages.

This is the second edition of this publication, which contains four units and 41 chapters. The first unit is "Understanding the Aging Population" and gives an overview of our aging society and the growth and development of gerontologi cai nursing. The author delves into the theories of aging, normal aging and the aging family. The second unit is "Promoting Wellness and Selfcare." In this unit, the author addresses concepts important to good health. Aged-related factors that could threaten wellness are listed, along with potential nursing problems. Some nursing interventions are suggested for supporting wellness and self-care.

Unit three covers "Pathologies of Aging." Disease problems related to various body systems are addressed as well as cancer, mental health, emergencies, pharmacology and rehabilitative care. Each chapter contains a helpful chart that lists nursing diagnoses related to the body system and the probable contributing factors. In unit four, geriatric care issues are considered. Some issues include chronic illness, death and dying, legal and ethical considerations. Following the last chapter, the author provides the reader with a brief bibliography for each chapter. An appendix with a few popular assessment tools is included.

Information is not always easy to locate. For example, teaching principles important in working with the aged are located in the chapter on diabetes. An environmental check list is located in the chapter on safety rather than in the chapter on Environmental Considerations.

The chapter on Environmental Considerations could be organized in a more logical manner. For example, the author moves back and forth between home environment and institutional environment without warning, and therefore, it requires careful reading to keep up with which environment is being considered. The chapter on diabetes addresses insulin and the first generation oral hypoglycemic agents with no mention made of second generation oral hypoglycemic agents.

In the preface, the author states "this book is designed as an introduction to gerontology, geriatrics and nursing care of the aged." This is exactly what this book is - an introduction. Licensed practical nurses or registered nurses wanting some information on aging might find it helpful, but registered nurses working directly with the aged will not. This book can have limited use in nursing education or registered nurses working with the aged.…

Gerontological Nursing. Eliopoulos C. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Company, 1987, 489 pages.

This is the second edition of this publication, which contains four units and 41 chapters. The first unit is "Understanding the Aging Population" and gives an overview of our aging society and the growth and development of gerontologi cai nursing. The author delves into the theories of aging, normal aging and the aging family. The second unit is "Promoting Wellness and Selfcare." In this unit, the author addresses concepts important to good health. Aged-related factors that could threaten wellness are listed, along with potential nursing problems. Some nursing interventions are suggested for supporting wellness and self-care.

Unit three covers "Pathologies of Aging." Disease problems related to various body systems are addressed as well as cancer, mental health, emergencies, pharmacology and rehabilitative care. Each chapter contains a helpful chart that lists nursing diagnoses related to the body system and the probable contributing factors. In unit four, geriatric care issues are considered. Some issues include chronic illness, death and dying, legal and ethical considerations. Following the last chapter, the author provides the reader with a brief bibliography for each chapter. An appendix with a few popular assessment tools is included.

Information is not always easy to locate. For example, teaching principles important in working with the aged are located in the chapter on diabetes. An environmental check list is located in the chapter on safety rather than in the chapter on Environmental Considerations.

The chapter on Environmental Considerations could be organized in a more logical manner. For example, the author moves back and forth between home environment and institutional environment without warning, and therefore, it requires careful reading to keep up with which environment is being considered. The chapter on diabetes addresses insulin and the first generation oral hypoglycemic agents with no mention made of second generation oral hypoglycemic agents.

In the preface, the author states "this book is designed as an introduction to gerontology, geriatrics and nursing care of the aged." This is exactly what this book is - an introduction. Licensed practical nurses or registered nurses wanting some information on aging might find it helpful, but registered nurses working directly with the aged will not. This book can have limited use in nursing education or registered nurses working with the aged.

10.3928/0098-9134-19890301-19

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