Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Professional Education and Practice of Nurse Administrators/ Directors of Nursing in LongTerm Care (Phase 11)

Marie F Santiago, RN, C, MA, MEd

Abstract

Professional Education and Practice of Nurse Administrators/ Directors of Nursing in LongTerm Care (Phase II). Lodge MP, Pietraschke F. Kansas City, MO. American Nurses Foundation, Inc. 1986, 91 pages, paperback.

This excellent and timely book presents and summarizes the implementation of a second-phase, or Phase II, grant-funded project undertaken by the authors through the American Nurses Foundation during a 20-month period from 1984 to 1986. The purpose of this Phase II project was to expand the efforts of the first (Phase I) project, which focused on the professional education and practice of nurse administrators/directors of nursing in longterm care. The outcomes of the project's implementation and objectives were described by the authors in five chapters.

The rationale upon which the project was based was built upon the premise that nurse administrators and directors of nursing in long-term care should be prepared for their leadership roles through theoretical study and practical learning experiences in the setting in which they plan to practice. This leadership role preparation is essential in assuring the quality of nursing service delivered to clients in long-term care. A continuing education program was developed concurrently with the project, in an attempt to upgrade individuals holding nurse administrator positions who have not acheived the educational level prescribed for a leadership role. Seven cooperating universities were contracted to implement this new continuing education program.

Hie five chapters in the book are well organized, logical, and clearly written. Although information on the roles and modalities of implementation of the continuing education program by the seven cooperating universities is redundant at times, the authors provide the reader with sufficient data gathered from the project.

This book is a valuable reference for practitioners at all levels, and educators in gerontologie al nursing and allied health disciplines. Appendices at the end of the book highlight all of the important information and elements of the project and the continuing education program components participated in by personnel. Ine recommendations and future imperatives for long-term care nursing provide very insightful and significant contributions to current research in gerontological nursing.…

Professional Education and Practice of Nurse Administrators/ Directors of Nursing in LongTerm Care (Phase II). Lodge MP, Pietraschke F. Kansas City, MO. American Nurses Foundation, Inc. 1986, 91 pages, paperback.

This excellent and timely book presents and summarizes the implementation of a second-phase, or Phase II, grant-funded project undertaken by the authors through the American Nurses Foundation during a 20-month period from 1984 to 1986. The purpose of this Phase II project was to expand the efforts of the first (Phase I) project, which focused on the professional education and practice of nurse administrators/directors of nursing in longterm care. The outcomes of the project's implementation and objectives were described by the authors in five chapters.

The rationale upon which the project was based was built upon the premise that nurse administrators and directors of nursing in long-term care should be prepared for their leadership roles through theoretical study and practical learning experiences in the setting in which they plan to practice. This leadership role preparation is essential in assuring the quality of nursing service delivered to clients in long-term care. A continuing education program was developed concurrently with the project, in an attempt to upgrade individuals holding nurse administrator positions who have not acheived the educational level prescribed for a leadership role. Seven cooperating universities were contracted to implement this new continuing education program.

Hie five chapters in the book are well organized, logical, and clearly written. Although information on the roles and modalities of implementation of the continuing education program by the seven cooperating universities is redundant at times, the authors provide the reader with sufficient data gathered from the project.

This book is a valuable reference for practitioners at all levels, and educators in gerontologie al nursing and allied health disciplines. Appendices at the end of the book highlight all of the important information and elements of the project and the continuing education program components participated in by personnel. Ine recommendations and future imperatives for long-term care nursing provide very insightful and significant contributions to current research in gerontological nursing.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880701-11

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