Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The New Nurse Manager: A Guide to Management Development

Pamela J Jackson-Malik, MSN, RN, MBA

Abstract

The New Nurse Manager: A Guide to Management Development. Sheridan DR, Bronstein JE, Walker DD. Rockville, MD, Aspen Publishers, 1984, 335 pages, hardcover, $29.95.

It is often erroneously assumed that every good nurse makes a good, new manager. This book, intended for the novice nurse manager, provides a comprehensive do-it-yourself, useful, selfdirecting reference. Each chapter gives the reader step-by-step introductions to basic management principles including role transitions, communication, leadership, planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and problem solving. In every chapter there are ample management theories, graphic models, case studies, and measurable self-assessment tools that assist the new manager in developing a management style and skills.

This well-written, easy-to-read, practical book was compiled by three experienced registered nurses who have thoroughly researched sound management theories and put them into a nursing perspective for today's nurse manager. The New Nurse Manager demystifies nursing management in three respects: It helps the professional registered nurse see herself as a manager; gives direction on how to be a manger; and allows individual assessment of effectiveness in the managerial role. I would highly recommend this book to any new nurse manager.…

The New Nurse Manager: A Guide to Management Development. Sheridan DR, Bronstein JE, Walker DD. Rockville, MD, Aspen Publishers, 1984, 335 pages, hardcover, $29.95.

It is often erroneously assumed that every good nurse makes a good, new manager. This book, intended for the novice nurse manager, provides a comprehensive do-it-yourself, useful, selfdirecting reference. Each chapter gives the reader step-by-step introductions to basic management principles including role transitions, communication, leadership, planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and problem solving. In every chapter there are ample management theories, graphic models, case studies, and measurable self-assessment tools that assist the new manager in developing a management style and skills.

This well-written, easy-to-read, practical book was compiled by three experienced registered nurses who have thoroughly researched sound management theories and put them into a nursing perspective for today's nurse manager. The New Nurse Manager demystifies nursing management in three respects: It helps the professional registered nurse see herself as a manager; gives direction on how to be a manger; and allows individual assessment of effectiveness in the managerial role. I would highly recommend this book to any new nurse manager.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880601-19

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents