Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The Arthritis Helpbook-A Tested Self-Management Program for Coping with Your Arthritis

Helen L Halstead, PhD, RN

Abstract

The Arthritis Helpbook- A Tested Self-Management Program for Coping with Your Arthritis. Lorig K, and Fries JE Reading, MA, Addison-Wesley, 1986.

The Arthritis Helpbook is aptly named for its cogent, practical guidelines for those persons needing help in dealing with the pain and problems of arthritis. It was written to supplement the medical treatment plans of individuals diagnosed with various rheumatic disease. Although rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, fibrositis, and bursitis are dealt with in most detail, the Helpbook would be useful for anyone with a rheumatic disease or those caring for such persons.

The book is a companion volume to another helpful reference, Arthritis, A Comprehensive Guide, written by Fries. The authors are identified with the Stanford University Arthritis Clinic, where the Helpbook has been utilized by thousands of persons afflicted with arthritis. Loring developed and directs the Arthritis Self-Management Patient Education Project, while Fries is Chief of the Arthritis Clinic at Stanford.

The current revision covers specific approaches to arthritis self-management to amplify upon the person's medical treatment. Exercise is emphasized for both its preventative and rehabilitative benefits. Over 50 exercises are explained and illustrated to assist the reader in quickly customizing an exercise program. Current medications for arthritis, with actions, side effects, dosages, and implications for each, are outlined. A new chapter on pain management for the arthritic elaborates upon specific techniques, as relaxation exercises, guided imagery, massage, and refocusing. The chapter on dietary care emphasizes weight control and specific nutrition especially beneficial to the arthritic.

A prob lem- sol v ing chapter offers guidelines for overcoming three monsters of arthritis - pain, fatigue, and stiffness. The reassuring content on coping deals with such concerns as depression, sleep disturbances, travel adaptations, and communication with physicians. Sexuality is discussed realistically, focusing attention upon communication between partners. A chapter of over 100 self-help suggestions is itself worth the price of the book.

Packed with helpful hints collected from life experiences of persons with arthritis, and tested by research, the Helpbook is a must for persons with arthritis, professional use, and for office and library reference. The practical content, accompanied by a conversational presentation and an economical price make this book a must.…

The Arthritis Helpbook- A Tested Self-Management Program for Coping with Your Arthritis. Lorig K, and Fries JE Reading, MA, Addison-Wesley, 1986.

The Arthritis Helpbook is aptly named for its cogent, practical guidelines for those persons needing help in dealing with the pain and problems of arthritis. It was written to supplement the medical treatment plans of individuals diagnosed with various rheumatic disease. Although rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, fibrositis, and bursitis are dealt with in most detail, the Helpbook would be useful for anyone with a rheumatic disease or those caring for such persons.

The book is a companion volume to another helpful reference, Arthritis, A Comprehensive Guide, written by Fries. The authors are identified with the Stanford University Arthritis Clinic, where the Helpbook has been utilized by thousands of persons afflicted with arthritis. Loring developed and directs the Arthritis Self-Management Patient Education Project, while Fries is Chief of the Arthritis Clinic at Stanford.

The current revision covers specific approaches to arthritis self-management to amplify upon the person's medical treatment. Exercise is emphasized for both its preventative and rehabilitative benefits. Over 50 exercises are explained and illustrated to assist the reader in quickly customizing an exercise program. Current medications for arthritis, with actions, side effects, dosages, and implications for each, are outlined. A new chapter on pain management for the arthritic elaborates upon specific techniques, as relaxation exercises, guided imagery, massage, and refocusing. The chapter on dietary care emphasizes weight control and specific nutrition especially beneficial to the arthritic.

A prob lem- sol v ing chapter offers guidelines for overcoming three monsters of arthritis - pain, fatigue, and stiffness. The reassuring content on coping deals with such concerns as depression, sleep disturbances, travel adaptations, and communication with physicians. Sexuality is discussed realistically, focusing attention upon communication between partners. A chapter of over 100 self-help suggestions is itself worth the price of the book.

Packed with helpful hints collected from life experiences of persons with arthritis, and tested by research, the Helpbook is a must for persons with arthritis, professional use, and for office and library reference. The practical content, accompanied by a conversational presentation and an economical price make this book a must.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880601-18

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