Journal of Gerontological Nursing

EDITORIAL 

Starting a JGN Emeriti Board: An Idea whose time has come?

Barbara Allen Davis, EdD, RNC, FAAN

Abstract

In August 1984, 1 became Assistant Professor Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing, in my specialty area of gerontological nursing. This title was bestowed on me because I had given the requisite number of years of service and had acquired a specific age (62 years). Within another three years, the American Academy of Nursings policies permitted me to change my Fellow status to "Emeritus, " in recognition of having reached 65 years of age. Moving into an emeritus category with two prestigious groups sparked my interest in exploring an Emeriti Editorial Board for the Journal of Gerontological Nursing. For me, emeritus means an honorary title corresponding to that held during active service.

Here are some ideas about a JGN Emeriti Editorial Board:

- Creation of an Emeriti Board would be operationalizing the Journal's belief and philosophy in the worth and wisdom of the older individual.

- Membership on the Emeriti Board would be voluntary.

- This Board would allow the Journal to continue to enjoy the prestige of using the names of nurses who have contributed to care of the aged; and conversely have a similar effect on the Emeriti members.

- Additional members could be added to the present Board as some members move to Emeritus status.

- To qualify for Emeritus status, a Board member should meet the following criteria:

1 ) Be at least 65 years of age.

2] Have served on the Board for a minimum number of years, possibly five.

3) Be willing to continue to review manuscripts.

- The workload of Emeriti Board members would be reduced, eg fewer manuscripts per year, and not obligated to produce an Editorial per schedule.

If the Emeriti Board becomes a reality, I will apply for charter membership. I am a member of the first Editorial Advisory Board and only member /eft from the original Board. Over the years, I have written five editorials, including the editorial in Volume I, Issue I 1975. Two special issues of the Journal carry my name as guest editor. A paper on the specially of gerontological nursing, under my authorship, was published in the Journal. Over the past 14 years, I have mentored several neophyte first time writers in the development of papers which have led to successful manuscripts. As a Board member, I have reviewed hundreds of manuscripts during my tenure.

I have not seen an Emeriti Board on any journal masthead; perhaps JGN would be the first to create one. It could be implemented readily by contacting former Board members.

I would like to hear from our readers with a response to the question: Is not an Emeriti Board an Idea whose time Is now?…

In August 1984, 1 became Assistant Professor Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing, in my specialty area of gerontological nursing. This title was bestowed on me because I had given the requisite number of years of service and had acquired a specific age (62 years). Within another three years, the American Academy of Nursings policies permitted me to change my Fellow status to "Emeritus, " in recognition of having reached 65 years of age. Moving into an emeritus category with two prestigious groups sparked my interest in exploring an Emeriti Editorial Board for the Journal of Gerontological Nursing. For me, emeritus means an honorary title corresponding to that held during active service.

Here are some ideas about a JGN Emeriti Editorial Board:

- Creation of an Emeriti Board would be operationalizing the Journal's belief and philosophy in the worth and wisdom of the older individual.

- Membership on the Emeriti Board would be voluntary.

- This Board would allow the Journal to continue to enjoy the prestige of using the names of nurses who have contributed to care of the aged; and conversely have a similar effect on the Emeriti members.

- Additional members could be added to the present Board as some members move to Emeritus status.

- To qualify for Emeritus status, a Board member should meet the following criteria:

1 ) Be at least 65 years of age.

2] Have served on the Board for a minimum number of years, possibly five.

3) Be willing to continue to review manuscripts.

- The workload of Emeriti Board members would be reduced, eg fewer manuscripts per year, and not obligated to produce an Editorial per schedule.

If the Emeriti Board becomes a reality, I will apply for charter membership. I am a member of the first Editorial Advisory Board and only member /eft from the original Board. Over the years, I have written five editorials, including the editorial in Volume I, Issue I 1975. Two special issues of the Journal carry my name as guest editor. A paper on the specially of gerontological nursing, under my authorship, was published in the Journal. Over the past 14 years, I have mentored several neophyte first time writers in the development of papers which have led to successful manuscripts. As a Board member, I have reviewed hundreds of manuscripts during my tenure.

I have not seen an Emeriti Board on any journal masthead; perhaps JGN would be the first to create one. It could be implemented readily by contacting former Board members.

I would like to hear from our readers with a response to the question: Is not an Emeriti Board an Idea whose time Is now?

10.3928/0098-9134-19880501-03

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents