Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Clinical Geriatics

Francis A Flood, RN, C, MS

Abstract

Clinical Geriatics, Ed 3. Ro ss m an, I (ed). Philadelphia. JB Lippincott, 1986, 742 pages, hardcover.

Kudos to Dr Rossman on his third edition of this "classic" in the field of geriatrics. Written mainly for practicing physicians, this text is a wealth of practical , useful information for those registered professional nurses employed in the specialty of geriatrics or for those paraprofessionals and allied health-care providers interested in this rapidly expanding specialized field.

Many of the book's contributors (48 physicians, five scientists and psychologists, one registered dietician, and two dentists) are of world renown in the area of geriatrics and gerontology. New authors have been added since the first edition was written in 1970, along with many new and updated chapters relating to sleep disorders, falls, incontinence, and digestive disorders - all areas of special interest to the practicing registered nurse.

The book is divided into six main headings: "Aging Changes,1' "The Aged Patient - General Principles," "The Aged Patient and Clinical Specialities," "Musculoskeletal Problems in the Aged Patient," "Psychiatric and Behavioral Considerations in the Aged Patient," and "Special Topics in Geriatrics."

The text is easily read and comprehended and offers numerous charts, graphs, and black and white illustrations. It is written in a logical format and after each chapter there are extensive references and lists of suggested reading for those who want additional information pertaining to their special interests.

The book's only registered nurse contributor, who co-authored a chapter with a noted and well-published professor of gerontology on the topic of "The Changing Role Of The Physician With The Terminally 111 Elderly person," was disappointing. When one looks at the long list of contributors in the front of the book and sees a registered nurse as a contributor in a text written mainly for physicians, one assumes that the nurse will be providing information targeting the nursing profession, further advancing the specialty of geriatric nursing or sharing information useful to those practicing nurses in the field. The chapter was unrewarding in this respect. If she had authored a chapter of her own, perhaps on the same basic topic that she co-authored, but with a slight variation such as, "Clinical Geriatrics" it would have served as a very useful reference for all professionals in the field for a long time to come.…

Clinical Geriatics, Ed 3. Ro ss m an, I (ed). Philadelphia. JB Lippincott, 1986, 742 pages, hardcover.

Kudos to Dr Rossman on his third edition of this "classic" in the field of geriatrics. Written mainly for practicing physicians, this text is a wealth of practical , useful information for those registered professional nurses employed in the specialty of geriatrics or for those paraprofessionals and allied health-care providers interested in this rapidly expanding specialized field.

Many of the book's contributors (48 physicians, five scientists and psychologists, one registered dietician, and two dentists) are of world renown in the area of geriatrics and gerontology. New authors have been added since the first edition was written in 1970, along with many new and updated chapters relating to sleep disorders, falls, incontinence, and digestive disorders - all areas of special interest to the practicing registered nurse.

The book is divided into six main headings: "Aging Changes,1' "The Aged Patient - General Principles," "The Aged Patient and Clinical Specialities," "Musculoskeletal Problems in the Aged Patient," "Psychiatric and Behavioral Considerations in the Aged Patient," and "Special Topics in Geriatrics."

The text is easily read and comprehended and offers numerous charts, graphs, and black and white illustrations. It is written in a logical format and after each chapter there are extensive references and lists of suggested reading for those who want additional information pertaining to their special interests.

The book's only registered nurse contributor, who co-authored a chapter with a noted and well-published professor of gerontology on the topic of "The Changing Role Of The Physician With The Terminally 111 Elderly person," was disappointing. When one looks at the long list of contributors in the front of the book and sees a registered nurse as a contributor in a text written mainly for physicians, one assumes that the nurse will be providing information targeting the nursing profession, further advancing the specialty of geriatric nursing or sharing information useful to those practicing nurses in the field. The chapter was unrewarding in this respect. If she had authored a chapter of her own, perhaps on the same basic topic that she co-authored, but with a slight variation such as, "Clinical Geriatrics" it would have served as a very useful reference for all professionals in the field for a long time to come.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880501-11

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