Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Facing Death and Loss

Diana M Raab, BSc, RN

Abstract

Facing Death and Loss. Ogg E. Lancaster, PA. Technomic Publishing Co, Ine, 1985, 97 pages.

This book serves as a good overview of the subject of death and dying for both the health-care professional and the public who may be facing either death or loss. The book reads in a colloquial and anecdotal style making it the type of book which may be read in one short sitting.

The book includes 12 chapters examining such issues as the fading taboo of death, a time to die, choosing death, battling for life, hospice care, terminal care, caring for heirs, death and children, mourning, and picking up the threads.

Although the author is not a healthcare professional, but with a number of books published as a free-lance writer, it is evident from her dedication that she has faced a personal loss . The combination of her personal loss and the research she has done make mis a very effective book for the novice in the field of death and dying.

The one drawback for this book in the classroom situation is that it fails to provide an index at the end, nor does it provide a list of references. It is apparent that it is not intended for textbook usage, but rather, may be a good supplement to other related books.…

Facing Death and Loss. Ogg E. Lancaster, PA. Technomic Publishing Co, Ine, 1985, 97 pages.

This book serves as a good overview of the subject of death and dying for both the health-care professional and the public who may be facing either death or loss. The book reads in a colloquial and anecdotal style making it the type of book which may be read in one short sitting.

The book includes 12 chapters examining such issues as the fading taboo of death, a time to die, choosing death, battling for life, hospice care, terminal care, caring for heirs, death and children, mourning, and picking up the threads.

Although the author is not a healthcare professional, but with a number of books published as a free-lance writer, it is evident from her dedication that she has faced a personal loss . The combination of her personal loss and the research she has done make mis a very effective book for the novice in the field of death and dying.

The one drawback for this book in the classroom situation is that it fails to provide an index at the end, nor does it provide a list of references. It is apparent that it is not intended for textbook usage, but rather, may be a good supplement to other related books.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880501-15

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