Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Gerontology in the Professional Nursing Curriculum

Cheryl Dellasega, CRNP, MS

Abstract

Gerontology in the Professional Nursing Curriculum. Crocei Ia EC (ed). New York. NLN Publication no. 15-2151, 1986, 86 pages, paperback.

Persons interested in developing or revising nursing courses with gerontologie content will appreciate the "cookbook" approach of this text written by a nurse practitioner/educator and two professors of nursing. The book identifies three models for gerontologie education (liberal, scientific, and professional) and discusses interdisciplinary aspects of essential content.

Relevant nursing frameworks and the application of the nursing process to care for die elderly persons are presented, along with useful techniques and settings for both didactic and clinical student experiences. Each of the five chapters has an extensive, fairly current bibliography, another potential resource for persons devising curriculum.

The very strength of this book is also its weakness. While the content is broad enough to offer a variety of options, the novice (and recent studies suggest that most faculty dealing with gerontologie nursing fall in this category) may need more structure. Samples of course syllabi and more research studies that support the author's beliefs would be helpful. For example, instead of encouraging faculty to formulate clinical competencies based on the ANA standards of gerontological nursing, some actual behaviors could be identified.

A more prominent role for health education in relation to the elderly is suggested. Although health promotion is mentioned in the first chapter, later chapters deal primarily with illness and health problems.…

Gerontology in the Professional Nursing Curriculum. Crocei Ia EC (ed). New York. NLN Publication no. 15-2151, 1986, 86 pages, paperback.

Persons interested in developing or revising nursing courses with gerontologie content will appreciate the "cookbook" approach of this text written by a nurse practitioner/educator and two professors of nursing. The book identifies three models for gerontologie education (liberal, scientific, and professional) and discusses interdisciplinary aspects of essential content.

Relevant nursing frameworks and the application of the nursing process to care for die elderly persons are presented, along with useful techniques and settings for both didactic and clinical student experiences. Each of the five chapters has an extensive, fairly current bibliography, another potential resource for persons devising curriculum.

The very strength of this book is also its weakness. While the content is broad enough to offer a variety of options, the novice (and recent studies suggest that most faculty dealing with gerontologie nursing fall in this category) may need more structure. Samples of course syllabi and more research studies that support the author's beliefs would be helpful. For example, instead of encouraging faculty to formulate clinical competencies based on the ANA standards of gerontological nursing, some actual behaviors could be identified.

A more prominent role for health education in relation to the elderly is suggested. Although health promotion is mentioned in the first chapter, later chapters deal primarily with illness and health problems.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880501-14

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