Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Planning Home Care With the Elderly: Patient, Family & Professional Views of an Alternative to Institutionalization

Laurie Diane Larson, BSN, RN, GNP

Abstract

Planning Home Care With the Elderly: Patient, Family & Professional Views of an Alternative to Institutionalization. Sager AP. Cambridge, Ballinger, 1983, 320 pages, $26.50.

Supports for increased home care funding are often difficult to find; this book outlines many advantages of home care. The book reports a comparative study of the cost of home care services and institutional care. Professionals, patients, and their families were interviewed to obtain their views concerning needed in-home services.

The study used the method of hypothetical diversion due to the difficulty of obtaining reliable information regarding comparative costs and benefits of home and institutional care using a traditional controlled experiment.

This reviewer feels the information is presented objectively, with all sides of the issues documented. The study designs are explained clearly, and information discussed is pertinent to the current status of home care services. The author takes a realistic look at the problems confronting advocates of in-home services.

Included with the study is a wellwritten history of health care and the evolution of nursing homes. The author also documents the extent of growth in long-term care spending in this country, with several reasons for recent growth and why it can be expected to continue.

The final chapter gives concrete ideas for workable plans to design home care for elderly clients. Information presented in this book is clear and usable by all professionals who are involved in planning home care for the elderly. The author has done a superb job of documenting cost and effectiveness of care planning for elderly clients who would benefit from in-home services.…

Planning Home Care With the Elderly: Patient, Family & Professional Views of an Alternative to Institutionalization. Sager AP. Cambridge, Ballinger, 1983, 320 pages, $26.50.

Supports for increased home care funding are often difficult to find; this book outlines many advantages of home care. The book reports a comparative study of the cost of home care services and institutional care. Professionals, patients, and their families were interviewed to obtain their views concerning needed in-home services.

The study used the method of hypothetical diversion due to the difficulty of obtaining reliable information regarding comparative costs and benefits of home and institutional care using a traditional controlled experiment.

This reviewer feels the information is presented objectively, with all sides of the issues documented. The study designs are explained clearly, and information discussed is pertinent to the current status of home care services. The author takes a realistic look at the problems confronting advocates of in-home services.

Included with the study is a wellwritten history of health care and the evolution of nursing homes. The author also documents the extent of growth in long-term care spending in this country, with several reasons for recent growth and why it can be expected to continue.

The final chapter gives concrete ideas for workable plans to design home care for elderly clients. Information presented in this book is clear and usable by all professionals who are involved in planning home care for the elderly. The author has done a superb job of documenting cost and effectiveness of care planning for elderly clients who would benefit from in-home services.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880301-13

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