Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

A Guide To Management And Supervision In Nursing Homes

Dolores M Alford, MSN, RN, FAAN

Abstract

A Guide To Management And Supervision In Nursing Homes. Burger SG, Sullivan Miller BH, and Mauney BF. Springfield, IL. Charles C. Thomas Publisher, 1986, 531 pages, hardcover.

When one first reads this huge volume and finds the hundreds of topics addressed, the tendency will be to regard this book as superficial. However, when the content is reread, one will find excellent practical information that could only be documented from years of experience. The book is a wealth of information on just about everything one needs to know about starting and managing a nursing home.

The style of the book is to say to the reader, "So, you want to start or manage a nursing home. Then, this is what you must do and consider. Here are the issues and the dilemmas." Case studies preface chapters and sections to illustrate how to go about accomplishing a management task. At the end of each chapter are reference notes and an annotated resource list of books, journals, pamphlets, associations, and organizations. While giving names and addresses can be risky in books, the listings are an excellent addition and worth the risk of having the information obsolete.

The book is divided into three sections. The first section is entitled "Administration." This section includes such topics as the administrative body, financial management financing, legal aspects, purchasing supplies and equipment, personnel, medical records, and education. The second section, entitled "Direct Care and Support Services," includes topics on the many services vital to a nursing home: nursing, medical, social, resident activities, rehabilitation, audiology, ophthalmological, physical therapy, occupational therapy, podiatry, dental, pharmacy, radiological, laboratory, dietary, environmental, and maintenance.

The last section, entitled "Making It Work," focuses on the building of a nursing home, including such topics as design and decor, choosing a builder, the admission process, resident's rights, safety and security, community relations, and keeping the nursing home running. There are 29 charts and figures to illustrate the formulas and to detail the organization of the nursing home.

From a nursing viewpoint, this book's real strength lies in the author's stand on the role of nursing and the professional nurse in nursing home practice. This is one of the few books on nursing home nursing that stands up for this profession and states unequivocally the need for and the role of professional nursing in the care of older adults. This is also one of the few books that speaks of the consequences of not having professional nurses manage the nursing care of residents. This book is very brave in warning nurses to resign or not even get involved in nursing homes that do not support quality nursing care of their residents. We need more of this kind of clear uplifting messages to nurses.

This book is highly recommended as a text for long-term health care administration students and for those persons wishing to buy, build, or invest in nursing homes. It also comes highly recommended to nurses who really want a deeper perspective of what it takes to manage a nursing home. The book should be read by every student before he/she begins educational experiences in a nursing home. Further, this book should be required reading for every employee of all nursing homes. Finally, potential users of nursing home services should read this book and utilize it in their initial and ongoing interactions with nursing home administrations. Maybe then, higher quality of services for residents of nursing homes will begin to emerge.…

A Guide To Management And Supervision In Nursing Homes. Burger SG, Sullivan Miller BH, and Mauney BF. Springfield, IL. Charles C. Thomas Publisher, 1986, 531 pages, hardcover.

When one first reads this huge volume and finds the hundreds of topics addressed, the tendency will be to regard this book as superficial. However, when the content is reread, one will find excellent practical information that could only be documented from years of experience. The book is a wealth of information on just about everything one needs to know about starting and managing a nursing home.

The style of the book is to say to the reader, "So, you want to start or manage a nursing home. Then, this is what you must do and consider. Here are the issues and the dilemmas." Case studies preface chapters and sections to illustrate how to go about accomplishing a management task. At the end of each chapter are reference notes and an annotated resource list of books, journals, pamphlets, associations, and organizations. While giving names and addresses can be risky in books, the listings are an excellent addition and worth the risk of having the information obsolete.

The book is divided into three sections. The first section is entitled "Administration." This section includes such topics as the administrative body, financial management financing, legal aspects, purchasing supplies and equipment, personnel, medical records, and education. The second section, entitled "Direct Care and Support Services," includes topics on the many services vital to a nursing home: nursing, medical, social, resident activities, rehabilitation, audiology, ophthalmological, physical therapy, occupational therapy, podiatry, dental, pharmacy, radiological, laboratory, dietary, environmental, and maintenance.

The last section, entitled "Making It Work," focuses on the building of a nursing home, including such topics as design and decor, choosing a builder, the admission process, resident's rights, safety and security, community relations, and keeping the nursing home running. There are 29 charts and figures to illustrate the formulas and to detail the organization of the nursing home.

From a nursing viewpoint, this book's real strength lies in the author's stand on the role of nursing and the professional nurse in nursing home practice. This is one of the few books on nursing home nursing that stands up for this profession and states unequivocally the need for and the role of professional nursing in the care of older adults. This is also one of the few books that speaks of the consequences of not having professional nurses manage the nursing care of residents. This book is very brave in warning nurses to resign or not even get involved in nursing homes that do not support quality nursing care of their residents. We need more of this kind of clear uplifting messages to nurses.

This book is highly recommended as a text for long-term health care administration students and for those persons wishing to buy, build, or invest in nursing homes. It also comes highly recommended to nurses who really want a deeper perspective of what it takes to manage a nursing home. The book should be read by every student before he/she begins educational experiences in a nursing home. Further, this book should be required reading for every employee of all nursing homes. Finally, potential users of nursing home services should read this book and utilize it in their initial and ongoing interactions with nursing home administrations. Maybe then, higher quality of services for residents of nursing homes will begin to emerge.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880301-12

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