Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Therapeutics in Terminal Cancer

Kathleen Taylor, MS, RN, C

Abstract

Therapeutics in Terminal Cancer. Robert G Twycross, and Sylvia A Lack. Bath, England, The Pitman Press, 1984, 207 pages, softcover.

The authors claim that this book is written primarily for physicians and the content is drawn from lecture notes used to teach a five-day course for physicians in the United States and Britain. The foreword by Dame Cicely Saunders suggests it to be of interest to those health professionals concerned with holistic care.

The British spelling, some abbreviations, and drug names (all explained in the preface) are somewhat distracting. However, the material is well organized and most of it should be extremely useful to nurses engaged in oncology nursing or who work for hospice agencies.

The text is distributed in softcover of a size that would be easily carried in clinical situations. Pertinent information is quickly located, for the material is organized by symptoms and the format is in outline form. The language is practical, concise, and clear. In addition to therapeutic suggestions for pain and drug management, this book contains a wealth of assessment, comfort, and preventive measures that, at least in this country, are generally managed by nurses, relatives, and other caretakers.

In addition, much of the information contained in the sections on alimentary symptoms, neuropsychological symptoms, psychotropic drugs, respiratory symptoms, urinary symptoms, and skin care will be useful to nurses who care for elderly patients who are not suffering from cancer.

"It (this book) is a fascinating example of reductionism that clarifies confusing situations but returns continually to see the whole, the individual person." From the foreword by Dame Cicely Saunders.…

Therapeutics in Terminal Cancer. Robert G Twycross, and Sylvia A Lack. Bath, England, The Pitman Press, 1984, 207 pages, softcover.

The authors claim that this book is written primarily for physicians and the content is drawn from lecture notes used to teach a five-day course for physicians in the United States and Britain. The foreword by Dame Cicely Saunders suggests it to be of interest to those health professionals concerned with holistic care.

The British spelling, some abbreviations, and drug names (all explained in the preface) are somewhat distracting. However, the material is well organized and most of it should be extremely useful to nurses engaged in oncology nursing or who work for hospice agencies.

The text is distributed in softcover of a size that would be easily carried in clinical situations. Pertinent information is quickly located, for the material is organized by symptoms and the format is in outline form. The language is practical, concise, and clear. In addition to therapeutic suggestions for pain and drug management, this book contains a wealth of assessment, comfort, and preventive measures that, at least in this country, are generally managed by nurses, relatives, and other caretakers.

In addition, much of the information contained in the sections on alimentary symptoms, neuropsychological symptoms, psychotropic drugs, respiratory symptoms, urinary symptoms, and skin care will be useful to nurses who care for elderly patients who are not suffering from cancer.

"It (this book) is a fascinating example of reductionism that clarifies confusing situations but returns continually to see the whole, the individual person." From the foreword by Dame Cicely Saunders.

10.3928/0098-9134-19880201-12

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