Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Leisure in Later Life: A Sourcebook for the Provision of Recreational Services for Elders

Susan A Acee, MN, RNC

Abstract

Leisure in Later Life: A Sourcebook for the Provision of Recreational Services for Elders. Leitner MJ, Leitner SF (ed). New York, The Haworth Press Ine, 1985, 341 pages, hardcover.

Professionals of many healthcare disciplines are increasingly interested in services intended to promote quality leisure activity for the elderly. This book is designed to be a useful resource text for those professionals, students, and volunteers responsible for leisure activity services for elderly persons functioning at a high level, low level, and with limited mobility.

The first four chapters of Leisure in Later Life nicely present background information relating to the concept of recreation and aging. Terminology is defined and topics covering demography of the older population, principles of recreational leadership, competencybased principles of program planning and two methods of program evaluation are reviewed. Chapters 5 through 8 focus on the provision of leisure activity services in different types of settings. These chapters are intended to help the reader understand why and how different styles of recreational leadership and program planning must be used to have a successful program in senior day care centers, senior centers and clubs, nursing homes, or retirement commu- , nities.

Specific ideas for various recreational programs, activities, and techniques are presented in chapters 9 through 14. Suggestions for intergenerational activities are especially practical.

Other practical suggestions for successful leisure counseling of the older adult, adapting exercise and dance for the elderly and program ideas using activities such as pet therapy, massage, drama, clowning, crafts, horticulture, humor, camping, and sports are favorably covered. The concluding chapters of 15 through 17 commendably explore the issues of recreation in hospice care, recreation and the rural elderly, and sexuality in later life.

In the preface, the authors state av desire to design a comprehensive text to fill a literary void they believe exists in the topic of recreation and aging. In my opinion, their efforts are a success.…

Leisure in Later Life: A Sourcebook for the Provision of Recreational Services for Elders. Leitner MJ, Leitner SF (ed). New York, The Haworth Press Ine, 1985, 341 pages, hardcover.

Professionals of many healthcare disciplines are increasingly interested in services intended to promote quality leisure activity for the elderly. This book is designed to be a useful resource text for those professionals, students, and volunteers responsible for leisure activity services for elderly persons functioning at a high level, low level, and with limited mobility.

The first four chapters of Leisure in Later Life nicely present background information relating to the concept of recreation and aging. Terminology is defined and topics covering demography of the older population, principles of recreational leadership, competencybased principles of program planning and two methods of program evaluation are reviewed. Chapters 5 through 8 focus on the provision of leisure activity services in different types of settings. These chapters are intended to help the reader understand why and how different styles of recreational leadership and program planning must be used to have a successful program in senior day care centers, senior centers and clubs, nursing homes, or retirement commu- , nities.

Specific ideas for various recreational programs, activities, and techniques are presented in chapters 9 through 14. Suggestions for intergenerational activities are especially practical.

Other practical suggestions for successful leisure counseling of the older adult, adapting exercise and dance for the elderly and program ideas using activities such as pet therapy, massage, drama, clowning, crafts, horticulture, humor, camping, and sports are favorably covered. The concluding chapters of 15 through 17 commendably explore the issues of recreation in hospice care, recreation and the rural elderly, and sexuality in later life.

In the preface, the authors state av desire to design a comprehensive text to fill a literary void they believe exists in the topic of recreation and aging. In my opinion, their efforts are a success.

10.3928/0098-9134-19870601-13

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