Journal of Gerontological Nursing

The Thinking Skills Workbook: A Cognitive Remediation Manual for Adults

Ellen B Barbieri, MPA, RN, C

Abstract

The Thinking Skills Workbook: A Cognitive Remediation Manual for Adults, ed 2. Carter LT, Caruso JL, and L angui rand MA. Springfield, 111. Charles C. Thomas, 1984, 224 pages, $19.95, softcover.

This much-needed workbook is designed to provide a treatment program for adults with cognitive skill deficits resulting from stroke, brain injury, or the effects of the aging process. The workbook is the result of several years of research and use by psychologists, occupational therapists, and volunteer teachers in rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, and private homes. The goal of the workbook is to help the learner improve his or her level of everyday thinking and, thus, obtain an overall higher level of independence.

The format is excellent. Instructions to the teacher are clear, concise, and preceed each section and every exercise. Diagrams and printed material are large and in bold type. The five sections are: Paying Attention and Reading, Concentrating on Detail, Attention Span and Awareness of Time, Remembering, and Reasoning and Comprehension. Pre- and posttests are included to help identify deficits and assess overall improvement. The cognitive skills covered range in type and difficulty from less complex tasks, such as letter recognition and following directions, to more difficult tasks, such as remembering and sequencing events. The exercises, over 150 in number, should be used in individual training sessions, providing immediate feedback and positive reinforcement to the learner. This second edition has been expanded and modified to include the iftput from therapists who have taught with this book. Many new exercises in the area of higher level reasoning, attention span, and memory skills have been added.

I highly recommend this book to all professionals and students working with the cognitively impaired adult: nurses, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and psychologists. With training, families and volunteers could be used to assist in reinforcing learning and work with the professional team in this very important and often overlooked area - thinking skill deficits.…

The Thinking Skills Workbook: A Cognitive Remediation Manual for Adults, ed 2. Carter LT, Caruso JL, and L angui rand MA. Springfield, 111. Charles C. Thomas, 1984, 224 pages, $19.95, softcover.

This much-needed workbook is designed to provide a treatment program for adults with cognitive skill deficits resulting from stroke, brain injury, or the effects of the aging process. The workbook is the result of several years of research and use by psychologists, occupational therapists, and volunteer teachers in rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, and private homes. The goal of the workbook is to help the learner improve his or her level of everyday thinking and, thus, obtain an overall higher level of independence.

The format is excellent. Instructions to the teacher are clear, concise, and preceed each section and every exercise. Diagrams and printed material are large and in bold type. The five sections are: Paying Attention and Reading, Concentrating on Detail, Attention Span and Awareness of Time, Remembering, and Reasoning and Comprehension. Pre- and posttests are included to help identify deficits and assess overall improvement. The cognitive skills covered range in type and difficulty from less complex tasks, such as letter recognition and following directions, to more difficult tasks, such as remembering and sequencing events. The exercises, over 150 in number, should be used in individual training sessions, providing immediate feedback and positive reinforcement to the learner. This second edition has been expanded and modified to include the iftput from therapists who have taught with this book. Many new exercises in the area of higher level reasoning, attention span, and memory skills have been added.

I highly recommend this book to all professionals and students working with the cognitively impaired adult: nurses, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and psychologists. With training, families and volunteers could be used to assist in reinforcing learning and work with the professional team in this very important and often overlooked area - thinking skill deficits.

10.3928/0098-9134-19870501-13

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