Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Diet and Cancer

Roberta L Messner, RNC, BSN, CIC

Abstract

Diet and Cancer. Creasey WA. Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1985, 221 pages, softcover.

The relationship between diet and the prevention, development, progression, and treatment of cancer is currently receiving widespread attention. Creasey, who states that 80% to 90% of cancer in humans can be attributed to the influence of the environment, approaches this topic from the role of diet in the promotion and inhibition of carcinogenesis. The role of protein and caloric intake, dietary fiber and fat, vitamins, minerals, alcohol, coffee, and various food additives are also explored.

A central theme of the book concerns the possibility that alteration of dietary factors might diminish the risk of cancer. The author is quick to point out, however, that associations between diet and cancer are often multifactorial, and may be influenced by geographic location, lifestyle, occupational history, environmental exposure, and genetic endowment. Considerable attention is also devoted to current procedures for dietary studies as well as malnutrition and enteral and parenteral nutritional support in cancer patients.

Diet and Cancer will be a helpful resource for both clinicians and researchers from a variety of disciplines interested in this complex phenomenon. The information provided is a comprehensive combination of theory and practice and provides the needed impetus for further systematic inquiry.…

Diet and Cancer. Creasey WA. Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1985, 221 pages, softcover.

The relationship between diet and the prevention, development, progression, and treatment of cancer is currently receiving widespread attention. Creasey, who states that 80% to 90% of cancer in humans can be attributed to the influence of the environment, approaches this topic from the role of diet in the promotion and inhibition of carcinogenesis. The role of protein and caloric intake, dietary fiber and fat, vitamins, minerals, alcohol, coffee, and various food additives are also explored.

A central theme of the book concerns the possibility that alteration of dietary factors might diminish the risk of cancer. The author is quick to point out, however, that associations between diet and cancer are often multifactorial, and may be influenced by geographic location, lifestyle, occupational history, environmental exposure, and genetic endowment. Considerable attention is also devoted to current procedures for dietary studies as well as malnutrition and enteral and parenteral nutritional support in cancer patients.

Diet and Cancer will be a helpful resource for both clinicians and researchers from a variety of disciplines interested in this complex phenomenon. The information provided is a comprehensive combination of theory and practice and provides the needed impetus for further systematic inquiry.

10.3928/0098-9134-19871201-14

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