Journal of Gerontological Nursing

NEWS UPDATE 

STATISTICS ON AGING PUBLISHED

Abstract

In 1984, eight percent of younger workers were self-employed. What percentage of workers 65+ were selfemployed?

Of the 17.9 million households headed by older persons in 1984, what percentage were homeowners?

Although representing only 12% of the US population in 1984, what percentage of total personal healthcare expenditures were accounted for by Americans 65+?

Eye-opening answers to questions such as these can be found in the booklet, "A Profile of Older Americans: 1985." Startling statistics illuminated by pie charts, bar graphs, and demographic maps reveal an America that is aging, living longer, on the move, and better educated than ever.

In "A Profile of Older Americans: 1985," you'll find an analysis of America's fastest growing population segment (projections indicate that by the year 2030, Americans 65+ will represent nearly a quarter of the nation's population) as it relates to

* Housing;

* Income;

* Education;

* Employment;

* Health and health care;

* Geographic distribution; and

* Racial and ethnic composition.

"Profiles" is just one of the many outreach efforts that are part of A ARP's ongoing commitment to enhance the quality of life for all older Americans. For information describing other AARP programs and services, write to the Program Resources Department at the American Association of Retired Persons, 1909 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20049; or call (202) 872-4700.…

In 1984, eight percent of younger workers were self-employed. What percentage of workers 65+ were selfemployed?

Of the 17.9 million households headed by older persons in 1984, what percentage were homeowners?

Although representing only 12% of the US population in 1984, what percentage of total personal healthcare expenditures were accounted for by Americans 65+?

Eye-opening answers to questions such as these can be found in the booklet, "A Profile of Older Americans: 1985." Startling statistics illuminated by pie charts, bar graphs, and demographic maps reveal an America that is aging, living longer, on the move, and better educated than ever.

In "A Profile of Older Americans: 1985," you'll find an analysis of America's fastest growing population segment (projections indicate that by the year 2030, Americans 65+ will represent nearly a quarter of the nation's population) as it relates to

* Housing;

* Income;

* Education;

* Employment;

* Health and health care;

* Geographic distribution; and

* Racial and ethnic composition.

"Profiles" is just one of the many outreach efforts that are part of A ARP's ongoing commitment to enhance the quality of life for all older Americans. For information describing other AARP programs and services, write to the Program Resources Department at the American Association of Retired Persons, 1909 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20049; or call (202) 872-4700.

10.3928/0098-9134-19860701-18

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents