Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

The Dilemma of Caring For Your Older Loved One or Friend

Michelle Griffin, MSN, RNC

Abstract

The Dilemma of Caring For Your Older Loved One or Friend. McNulty EB and Dann MS. Springfield, Illinois, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, 1985, 253 pages, hardcover.

This book consists of true life experiences and biographies of individuals involved in caring and decision making for an older relative or friend. These biographies are not for the average reader but are useful for individuals involved in healthcare professions, education, and counseling. A word of caution: As one reads the real life accounts, an individual reader faced with similar experiences may come away with more confusion or guilt than help.

The biographies need to be read as informative pieces, neither good nor bad, but rather reflections of the events that affected and influenced the biographer. Approaching these biographies in this way, the reader is then provided with useful real life experiences that illustrate processes involved in decision making, value shaping as an influence on decision making, and other facets of the "dilemma of caring."

The final three chapters fall short of the authors attempt to suggest methods for coping. The lists of agencies for assistance, advice, and support that appear in these chapters would have better served the reader had they been provided at the end of each biography. This would have afforded the reader an opportunity to analyze the biography more objectively and given the authors the opportunity to identify various strategies of coping and decision making.

If used as a resource, this book can provide topics for discussion of the issues that affect all individuals faced with caring for older adults.…

The Dilemma of Caring For Your Older Loved One or Friend. McNulty EB and Dann MS. Springfield, Illinois, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, 1985, 253 pages, hardcover.

This book consists of true life experiences and biographies of individuals involved in caring and decision making for an older relative or friend. These biographies are not for the average reader but are useful for individuals involved in healthcare professions, education, and counseling. A word of caution: As one reads the real life accounts, an individual reader faced with similar experiences may come away with more confusion or guilt than help.

The biographies need to be read as informative pieces, neither good nor bad, but rather reflections of the events that affected and influenced the biographer. Approaching these biographies in this way, the reader is then provided with useful real life experiences that illustrate processes involved in decision making, value shaping as an influence on decision making, and other facets of the "dilemma of caring."

The final three chapters fall short of the authors attempt to suggest methods for coping. The lists of agencies for assistance, advice, and support that appear in these chapters would have better served the reader had they been provided at the end of each biography. This would have afforded the reader an opportunity to analyze the biography more objectively and given the authors the opportunity to identify various strategies of coping and decision making.

If used as a resource, this book can provide topics for discussion of the issues that affect all individuals faced with caring for older adults.

10.3928/0098-9134-19861101-16

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents