Journal of Gerontological Nursing

NEWS UPDATE

Abstract

(ProQuest: ... denotes text missing in the original.)

INCONTINENCE

NATIONAL AGENDA DRAFTED TO AID THE INCONTINENT

Chicago - Health care experts from ... the nation drafted a mandate for ... to aid the 12 million Americans ... suffer from urinary incontinence.

The "National Agenda to Promote ... Continence" calls on ... nurses, professional ... manufacturers and the media to ... the plight of incontinent ...

A 10-point agenda was drafted, ... that:

* a national information center be established as a resource for consumers and medical professionals;

* incontinent people become advocates and "their own agents of change;"

* consumer organizations and professional associations educate members about the problem;

* medical and nursing schools emphasize incontinence in their curricula and develop standards of care for treatment;

* manufacturers develop more and better products, and improve the information that accompanies their products;

* increased public and private funding be directed to incontinence; and the media take the topic to the people to expand public awareness.

Twenty-five health care professionals ... the three-day conference, ... concluded with the drafting of ... national agenda. Participants ... physicians, nurses, home ... care and nursing home ... educators, consumer advocates ... manufacturers.

Symposium participants outlined ... actions to carry out the agenda.

... for Incontinent People (HIP), a patient advocacy group, will become a national clearinghouse and resource center for incontinence. Within the year, HIP will set up a national hotline, review and create consumer and professional education materials, and work with physicians, nurses and professional organizations to develop standards of care.

ONCOLOGY

DIET/CANCER LINK GROWING

Washington, DC - Several organizations have now concluded that scientific data on the relationship between diet and cancer are strong enough to warrant the development of dietary guidelines to lower cancer risk, according to Dr. T. Colin Campbell, Senior Science Advisor to the American Institute for Cancer Research.

To date, the available data "strongly suggest that a diet enriched in plant products reduces cancer risk," said Dr.

Campbell, a cancer researcher and professor of nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University. Cancer risk "increases with high intake of dietary fat and protein, and low intakes of food rich in vitamin C, vitamin A (as beta carotene), vitamin E, and dietary fiber. "

Dr. Campbell's status report on diet, nutrition and cancer summarized the studies that have been undertaken since the first major conference on the subject was held in 1975.

He said that of those guidelines, "the two that will have the most likely impact on consumers in the marketplace were the recommendations to reduce dietary fat intake from the current level of 40%-45% to 30% of total caloric intake, and to emphasize the importance of including fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereal products in the daily diet. " DEATH LAWS

ULC WORKS TOWARD UNIFORMITY IN NATURAL DEATH LEGISLATION

Chicago - States have been rushing to enact laws allowing adults more authority over decisions about life-sustaining medical treatment. Nearly half the states have adopted so-called "natural death" statutes; many more are likely to do so in the near future.

A committee of the Uniform Law Commissioners (ULC) is drafting a simple but comprehensive legislative proposal that could bring uniformity to these laws. Currently they vary widely in scope and content, So that an individual's ability to control decisions about life-prolonging treatment may depend on where he or she dies.

The proposed act, tentatively called Rights of the Terminally III Act (RTIA), was debated by the ULC at its 1984 annual meeting in Keystone, Colorado. It will undergo at least another year of revision before being considered by the entire ULC membership…

(ProQuest: ... denotes text missing in the original.)

INCONTINENCE

NATIONAL AGENDA DRAFTED TO AID THE INCONTINENT

Chicago - Health care experts from ... the nation drafted a mandate for ... to aid the 12 million Americans ... suffer from urinary incontinence.

The "National Agenda to Promote ... Continence" calls on ... nurses, professional ... manufacturers and the media to ... the plight of incontinent ...

A 10-point agenda was drafted, ... that:

* a national information center be established as a resource for consumers and medical professionals;

* incontinent people become advocates and "their own agents of change;"

* consumer organizations and professional associations educate members about the problem;

* medical and nursing schools emphasize incontinence in their curricula and develop standards of care for treatment;

* manufacturers develop more and better products, and improve the information that accompanies their products;

* increased public and private funding be directed to incontinence; and the media take the topic to the people to expand public awareness.

Twenty-five health care professionals ... the three-day conference, ... concluded with the drafting of ... national agenda. Participants ... physicians, nurses, home ... care and nursing home ... educators, consumer advocates ... manufacturers.

Symposium participants outlined ... actions to carry out the agenda.

... for Incontinent People (HIP), a patient advocacy group, will become a national clearinghouse and resource center for incontinence. Within the year, HIP will set up a national hotline, review and create consumer and professional education materials, and work with physicians, nurses and professional organizations to develop standards of care.

ONCOLOGY

DIET/CANCER LINK GROWING

Washington, DC - Several organizations have now concluded that scientific data on the relationship between diet and cancer are strong enough to warrant the development of dietary guidelines to lower cancer risk, according to Dr. T. Colin Campbell, Senior Science Advisor to the American Institute for Cancer Research.

To date, the available data "strongly suggest that a diet enriched in plant products reduces cancer risk," said Dr.

Campbell, a cancer researcher and professor of nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University. Cancer risk "increases with high intake of dietary fat and protein, and low intakes of food rich in vitamin C, vitamin A (as beta carotene), vitamin E, and dietary fiber. "

Dr. Campbell's status report on diet, nutrition and cancer summarized the studies that have been undertaken since the first major conference on the subject was held in 1975.

He said that of those guidelines, "the two that will have the most likely impact on consumers in the marketplace were the recommendations to reduce dietary fat intake from the current level of 40%-45% to 30% of total caloric intake, and to emphasize the importance of including fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereal products in the daily diet. " DEATH LAWS

ULC WORKS TOWARD UNIFORMITY IN NATURAL DEATH LEGISLATION

Chicago - States have been rushing to enact laws allowing adults more authority over decisions about life-sustaining medical treatment. Nearly half the states have adopted so-called "natural death" statutes; many more are likely to do so in the near future.

A committee of the Uniform Law Commissioners (ULC) is drafting a simple but comprehensive legislative proposal that could bring uniformity to these laws. Currently they vary widely in scope and content, So that an individual's ability to control decisions about life-prolonging treatment may depend on where he or she dies.

The proposed act, tentatively called Rights of the Terminally III Act (RTIA), was debated by the ULC at its 1984 annual meeting in Keystone, Colorado. It will undergo at least another year of revision before being considered by the entire ULC membership for approval and recommendation to all states for enactment.

The RTIA's basic purpose is to permit a competent adult to execute a document, called a "declaration," directing the withholding or withdrawal of lifesustaining medical procedures. The declaration, which must be signed, dated and witnessed, would take effect only when the adult is in a terminal condition, and no longer able to participate in decisions about his/her medical care.

Drafters of the proposed act intentionally limited its scope. The RTIA draft does not address treatment of persons who have not executed a declaration, and does not cover treatment of minors or decisions by proxy.

The draft act outlines a simple procedure for executing a declaration, and includes a suggested format.

10.3928/0098-9134-19850201-13

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