Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Turnover Among Nursing Personnel in Nursing Homes

Marie Santiago, RNC, MA, MEd

Abstract

Turnover Among Nursing Personnel in Nursing Homes. Halbur, B, Ann Arbor, Michigan: UMI Press, 1982, 71 pages.

This book, a 1978 research study of turnover of nursing personnel in 122 representative nursing homes in North Carolina, investigates three types of structural factors and their influence on personnel turnover rates.

The author's purpose is to use the major findings of her study as a basis to make recommendations for nursing home administrators, regulatory agencies, and for further investigation. This intention is clearly communicated and explicitly fulfilled, given the numerous suggestions and recommendations given by the author throughout the book.

There are seven chapters and two appendices contained in the book. The chapters are sequentially arranged according to the design of the research study. Each chapter is descriptive of the salient points that lead the reader to a better understanding of turnover, starting with an extensive review of literature. The model for the study of personnel turnover was based by the author on the major premises of the formal theory of structure and control by Jerald Hage in his 1980 book, Theories of Organizations: Form, Process and Transformation. The reader who is familiar with research design and methodology, and statistical analysis will find the book meaningful and beneficial in terms of the significance of the study itself, and its valuable implications for administrators, regulatory agencies and managerial nursing personnel.

Important issues such as recruitment, training and orientation of nursing home personnel are addressed in relation to the influence of these issues on personnel turnover. For example, the need for advancement through tuition reimbursement and inservice programs has been cited as an essential factor in an employee's job performance and job satisfaction. The author also suggests inexpensive rewards and timely and equitable material rewards and symbolic incentives as factors that can reduce turnover rates and promote job satisfaction.

The value of the book lies in its addition and contribution to the current knowledge of personnel turnover in nursing homes, which is presently meager, as stated by the author. This area is a potentially fertile field of investigation, for further study or replication, inasmuch as the field of gerontology is presently expanding, with the increasing number of elderly persons in the country, who may someday be recipients of care by nursing personnel.…

Turnover Among Nursing Personnel in Nursing Homes. Halbur, B, Ann Arbor, Michigan: UMI Press, 1982, 71 pages.

This book, a 1978 research study of turnover of nursing personnel in 122 representative nursing homes in North Carolina, investigates three types of structural factors and their influence on personnel turnover rates.

The author's purpose is to use the major findings of her study as a basis to make recommendations for nursing home administrators, regulatory agencies, and for further investigation. This intention is clearly communicated and explicitly fulfilled, given the numerous suggestions and recommendations given by the author throughout the book.

There are seven chapters and two appendices contained in the book. The chapters are sequentially arranged according to the design of the research study. Each chapter is descriptive of the salient points that lead the reader to a better understanding of turnover, starting with an extensive review of literature. The model for the study of personnel turnover was based by the author on the major premises of the formal theory of structure and control by Jerald Hage in his 1980 book, Theories of Organizations: Form, Process and Transformation. The reader who is familiar with research design and methodology, and statistical analysis will find the book meaningful and beneficial in terms of the significance of the study itself, and its valuable implications for administrators, regulatory agencies and managerial nursing personnel.

Important issues such as recruitment, training and orientation of nursing home personnel are addressed in relation to the influence of these issues on personnel turnover. For example, the need for advancement through tuition reimbursement and inservice programs has been cited as an essential factor in an employee's job performance and job satisfaction. The author also suggests inexpensive rewards and timely and equitable material rewards and symbolic incentives as factors that can reduce turnover rates and promote job satisfaction.

The value of the book lies in its addition and contribution to the current knowledge of personnel turnover in nursing homes, which is presently meager, as stated by the author. This area is a potentially fertile field of investigation, for further study or replication, inasmuch as the field of gerontology is presently expanding, with the increasing number of elderly persons in the country, who may someday be recipients of care by nursing personnel.

10.3928/0098-9134-19840801-14

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