Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Medical Devices and Instrumentation for the Elderly

Lorraine Bradford, RN, MS

Abstract

Medical Devices and Instrumentation for the Elderly, Harris, Arlington, VA: Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, 54 pages.

Without a doubt, the Association for the Advancement for Medical Instrumentation has presented a symposium, but gone one step further by publishing the material for a wider audience. Raymond Harris and Dwight E. Harken have edited this softcover booklet consisting of 23 pitiiy articles written primarily by researchers, biomedical engineers and healdi professionals.

The articles cover a wide range of topics in technical advances and their impact in the long-term setting. They are concise with added tables or figures for explanation . Each article also offers acknowledgments or references. Some of the writers argue that the new technology, such as environmental control systems allow for greater independence. However, the cost of utilizing some of the devices is prohibitive.

Some of the writers point out that successful use of these devices are dependent on mundane factors such as tiiird party payer policies. Also, some of the devices described are intricate and sophisticated and not practical for use by the cognitively impaired person.

One can glance through the booklet rapidly, but must go back to read each article thoroughly to absorb the exciting meaning of what this new technology will mean to our society in the future with the advent of our increased aged population. The new technology leaves the reader to ponder on the philosophical, moral and ethical issues mat the healdi professional is left to face in the daily delivery of care to the aged population.…

Medical Devices and Instrumentation for the Elderly, Harris, Arlington, VA: Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, 54 pages.

Without a doubt, the Association for the Advancement for Medical Instrumentation has presented a symposium, but gone one step further by publishing the material for a wider audience. Raymond Harris and Dwight E. Harken have edited this softcover booklet consisting of 23 pitiiy articles written primarily by researchers, biomedical engineers and healdi professionals.

The articles cover a wide range of topics in technical advances and their impact in the long-term setting. They are concise with added tables or figures for explanation . Each article also offers acknowledgments or references. Some of the writers argue that the new technology, such as environmental control systems allow for greater independence. However, the cost of utilizing some of the devices is prohibitive.

Some of the writers point out that successful use of these devices are dependent on mundane factors such as tiiird party payer policies. Also, some of the devices described are intricate and sophisticated and not practical for use by the cognitively impaired person.

One can glance through the booklet rapidly, but must go back to read each article thoroughly to absorb the exciting meaning of what this new technology will mean to our society in the future with the advent of our increased aged population. The new technology leaves the reader to ponder on the philosophical, moral and ethical issues mat the healdi professional is left to face in the daily delivery of care to the aged population.

10.3928/0098-9134-19840601-14

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