Journal of Gerontological Nursing

BOOKS 

Brook Lodge Symposium: Discharge Planning to Home Care

Donna L Algase, RN, BSN

Abstract

Brook Lodge Symposium: Discharge Planning to Home Care. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn HealthCare Services, 1982.

This monograph contains a summary of the proceedings of an invitational symposium on discharge planning sponsored by Upjohn HealthCare Services and published for the purpose of disseminating die ideas and conclusions of participating nurses and social workers. The stated goal of the symposium was to generate "innovative approaches and specific recommendations" for enhancing the discharge planning process.

Written in an informal manner the monograph presents a clear comprehensive view of the symposium. Included are summaries of faculty presentations addressing decision making in the discharge planning process, power and politics in discharge planning, and historical and future views of home health care. The outcome of a nominal group technique to identify ideas for increasing the effectiveness of working relationships between discharge planners and the home care industry is described in detail. Summaries of group discussions and individual participant contributions round out the reporting of issues and concerns in today's discharge planning and home health care scene. A useful inclusion is the roster of participants and faculty with full contact information.

From this booklet, the reader is able to identify the major issues and forces in discharge planning and home health care. The recommendations and approaches arising from die nominal group technique contain several useful suggestions for addressing the identified concerns of communication, hospital and home care organizational issues, quality assurance, client and family participation and education, and die lack of a national discharge planning network.

Healdi professionals active in discharge planning |and home health care will experience a sense of shared awareness in the reports of »symposium participants and faculty. I believe die booklet is limited in appeal to this group. Because of the experience represented in the suggestions of faculty and participants and due to the pioneering nature of the symposium itself, I recommend this monograph to nurses and otiier health professionals interested in current issues in continuity of care.…

Brook Lodge Symposium: Discharge Planning to Home Care. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn HealthCare Services, 1982.

This monograph contains a summary of the proceedings of an invitational symposium on discharge planning sponsored by Upjohn HealthCare Services and published for the purpose of disseminating die ideas and conclusions of participating nurses and social workers. The stated goal of the symposium was to generate "innovative approaches and specific recommendations" for enhancing the discharge planning process.

Written in an informal manner the monograph presents a clear comprehensive view of the symposium. Included are summaries of faculty presentations addressing decision making in the discharge planning process, power and politics in discharge planning, and historical and future views of home health care. The outcome of a nominal group technique to identify ideas for increasing the effectiveness of working relationships between discharge planners and the home care industry is described in detail. Summaries of group discussions and individual participant contributions round out the reporting of issues and concerns in today's discharge planning and home health care scene. A useful inclusion is the roster of participants and faculty with full contact information.

From this booklet, the reader is able to identify the major issues and forces in discharge planning and home health care. The recommendations and approaches arising from die nominal group technique contain several useful suggestions for addressing the identified concerns of communication, hospital and home care organizational issues, quality assurance, client and family participation and education, and die lack of a national discharge planning network.

Healdi professionals active in discharge planning |and home health care will experience a sense of shared awareness in the reports of »symposium participants and faculty. I believe die booklet is limited in appeal to this group. Because of the experience represented in the suggestions of faculty and participants and due to the pioneering nature of the symposium itself, I recommend this monograph to nurses and otiier health professionals interested in current issues in continuity of care.

10.3928/0098-9134-19840601-12

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