Journal of Gerontological Nursing

PUBLICATIONS 

Drugs and Nursing Implications

Patricia Walsh, RN, BSN

Abstract

Drugs and Nursing Implications, ed 4. By Laura E. Covoni and Janice Hayes. Norwalk, CT, Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1982. 1100 pages, $22.50.

This comprehensive fourth edition of Covoni and Hayes' Drugs and Nursing Implications has been enlarged to 1100 pages and expanded to include 100 new drugs.

The drug may be listed in the index four ways: by generic name, by trade name, by pharmacological action, and by chemical classification. A typical entry gives the generic name, whether the drug is listed in the United States Pharmacopeia, the action of the drug, and the phonetic pronunciation. I found the latter to be very helpful, as some of the generic names can be tongue twisters.

The entry continues with actions and uses of the drug, absorption, and fate. Contraindications and precautions are followed by adverse reactions, which are organized according to body system. The text also covers drug interactions and diagnostic test interferences. Route and dosage include pediatrie, adult, elderly, and debilitated elderly considerations. Nursing implications are printed on a beige background; all other information is printed on white. The nursing implications were complete and thorough. They included storage instructions and changes in appearance of the drug.

The book's strongest point is its completeness - it's all you ever wanted to know and more. 1 found the phonetic pronunciations and the dosage adjustments (when known) for the elderly especially helpful. This is the first drug handbook I've seen that has made an attempt to give dosage information regarding the elderly client.

I feel that this book belongs on a geriatric nursing unit. It would be a valuable addition to every nurse's library, regardless of the age of his/her clients.…

Drugs and Nursing Implications, ed 4. By Laura E. Covoni and Janice Hayes. Norwalk, CT, Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1982. 1100 pages, $22.50.

This comprehensive fourth edition of Covoni and Hayes' Drugs and Nursing Implications has been enlarged to 1100 pages and expanded to include 100 new drugs.

The drug may be listed in the index four ways: by generic name, by trade name, by pharmacological action, and by chemical classification. A typical entry gives the generic name, whether the drug is listed in the United States Pharmacopeia, the action of the drug, and the phonetic pronunciation. I found the latter to be very helpful, as some of the generic names can be tongue twisters.

The entry continues with actions and uses of the drug, absorption, and fate. Contraindications and precautions are followed by adverse reactions, which are organized according to body system. The text also covers drug interactions and diagnostic test interferences. Route and dosage include pediatrie, adult, elderly, and debilitated elderly considerations. Nursing implications are printed on a beige background; all other information is printed on white. The nursing implications were complete and thorough. They included storage instructions and changes in appearance of the drug.

The book's strongest point is its completeness - it's all you ever wanted to know and more. 1 found the phonetic pronunciations and the dosage adjustments (when known) for the elderly especially helpful. This is the first drug handbook I've seen that has made an attempt to give dosage information regarding the elderly client.

I feel that this book belongs on a geriatric nursing unit. It would be a valuable addition to every nurse's library, regardless of the age of his/her clients.

10.3928/0098-9134-19830801-15

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