Journal of Gerontological Nursing

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Abstract

Appearance of a product in this section does not in any way imply endorsement by the Journal of Gerontological Nursing, including its publisher and Editorial Board. This section is presented solely as a service to our subscribers.

Survalent Electronic Thermometer

PTI has reacquired the distribution rights for its Survalent electronic thermometer from Johnson & Johnson's Arbrook Surgikos division.

Survalent, which has been manufactured by PTI since its development eight year ago, will now be distributed by a new PTI division, Patient Technology International, Incorporated.

Presently in use in hospitals across the country, Survalent is said to provide accuracy within ±.2°F (±.1°C). With a capability of measurements from below 700F (21 0C) to 1400F (600C), the units are able to detect hypothermia in addition to operating in the clinical temperature range. Other features include: lower lifetime cost than fragile glass thermometers, flexible and disposable probe covers that eliminate glass breakage and cross-infection, readings in just 35 seconds, pulse timing system, rechargable batteries, manual on-off switch, and digital readout. A storage case with a built-in battery recharger is also standard.

Contact: Mr. Jack D. Leonard, Patient Technology International Incorporated, 107 Allen Boulevard, Farmingdale, New York 11735. 516/694-0002.

Audio- Visual High-Temperature Alarm Prevents Hot Water Scalding

Leonard Valve Company of Cranston, Rhode Island has introduced an audio-visual high-temperature alarm and shut-off system that monitors tempered hot water flow in hospitals, nursing homes, schools, institutions, and commercial facilities.

The Leonard AU- 100 Audio- Visual High-Temperature Alarm monitors tempers hot water supply lines to fixtures and bathing areas. If water temperature exceeds preset limits, the device automatically shuts off the flow and trips a buzzer and red light to wam of possible accidental scalding. The alarm control can be located conveniently at a nurse's or other attendant's station.

The wall mounted alarm comes complete with adjustable aquastat (factory set at UOF 43C), W IPS bulb well, warning light and buzzer, key-operated audio alarm switch, and push-button reset switch. Stainless steel cabinet and thermostatic mixing valve are optional. It measures 6" ? 6" ? 4". The Leonard AU-100 Audio Visual High-Temperature Alarm is list priced at $245 each, reach to install. Quantity discounts are offered.

Contact: Leonard Valve Company, Gregory L. Wilcox, Assistant Sales Manager. 1360 Elmwood Ave., Cranston, RI 02910. 401/461-1200.…

Appearance of a product in this section does not in any way imply endorsement by the Journal of Gerontological Nursing, including its publisher and Editorial Board. This section is presented solely as a service to our subscribers.

Knit Heel/Elbow Protectors with Meda-Foam for Pressure Relief

Knit heel/elbow protectors with l"-thick, open-celled Meda-Foam for pressure relief have been introduced by Mark One Hospital Products Inc.

Called Knittens, the new protectors provide the comfort and fit of knit, plus the ample circulation of air and pressure relief vital to tissue care and comfort that Meda-Foam promotes.

Meda-Foam in constructed of two thicknesses of reticulated polyurethane foam. The l/8"-thick top layer is made of fine-pored, powderpuff-grade foam for gentle, nonirritating skin contact. The 7/8"-thick, resilient, large-pored bottom layer distributes pressure evenly to prevent restriction of blood flow at critical bony prominence areas of heel or elbow.

Open cells of the Meda-Foam permit free flow of air to the patient's skin to aid healing and comfort. Each side of the MedaFoam is trimmed to permit the pad to wrap comfortably around the heel or elbow. Connecting loops in the knit expand and contract to provide a comfortable fit for small to very large patients. Meda-Foam is chemically and bacterially inert, non-toxic, non-allergenic, and nonstatic.

Contact: Mark One Hospital Products Inc., 18th and Courtland Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19140.

Exercise Series for the Elderly

Olga Bibza Adkins, professor of health and physical education emeritus, has designed a series of exercises for the elderly, all of which are done in a sitting position. Those exercises, and accompanying photographs, can be found in her book Get Moving! Exercises in Later Life. The book, which costs $3, is available through local bookstores or through the Scripps Foundation Gerontology Center, Miami University.

In addition to a sturdy chair, stool, or bench, all Adkins' program requires are a rubber ball and a yardstick. There are exercises for the ankles, knees, torso, shoulders, neck, eyes, arms, wrists, and hands. To make these more easy to perform, Adkins suggests music and the formation of exercise groups.

Contact: Jim Langley, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056.

Veinoclysis Set with I.V. Fluid Low Level Alert

Pixonic Corp. has announced the availability of a new veinoclysis set redesigned to include an electronic alert system, which signals visually by light emitting diodes, and audibly by tone generator, that the LV. fluid is about to run out.

The reusable electronic alert is battery operated and plugs into the sensing chamber. It is lightweight and of solid state construction for high reliability and long life. The audio tone generator signal can be heard easily yet it is not offensive or disturbing.

Contact: Pixonic Corporation, 22 Walter Street, Pearl River, New York 10965.

Survalent Electronic Thermometer

PTI has reacquired the distribution rights for its Survalent electronic thermometer from Johnson & Johnson's Arbrook Surgikos division.

Survalent, which has been manufactured by PTI since its development eight year ago, will now be distributed by a new PTI division, Patient Technology International, Incorporated.

Presently in use in hospitals across the country, Survalent is said to provide accuracy within ±.2°F (±.1°C). With a capability of measurements from below 700F (21 0C) to 1400F (600C), the units are able to detect hypothermia in addition to operating in the clinical temperature range. Other features include: lower lifetime cost than fragile glass thermometers, flexible and disposable probe covers that eliminate glass breakage and cross-infection, readings in just 35 seconds, pulse timing system, rechargable batteries, manual on-off switch, and digital readout. A storage case with a built-in battery recharger is also standard.

Contact: Mr. Jack D. Leonard, Patient Technology International Incorporated, 107 Allen Boulevard, Farmingdale, New York 11735. 516/694-0002.

Audio- Visual High-Temperature Alarm Prevents Hot Water Scalding

Leonard Valve Company of Cranston, Rhode Island has introduced an audio-visual high-temperature alarm and shut-off system that monitors tempered hot water flow in hospitals, nursing homes, schools, institutions, and commercial facilities.

The Leonard AU- 100 Audio- Visual High-Temperature Alarm monitors tempers hot water supply lines to fixtures and bathing areas. If water temperature exceeds preset limits, the device automatically shuts off the flow and trips a buzzer and red light to wam of possible accidental scalding. The alarm control can be located conveniently at a nurse's or other attendant's station.

The wall mounted alarm comes complete with adjustable aquastat (factory set at UOF 43C), W IPS bulb well, warning light and buzzer, key-operated audio alarm switch, and push-button reset switch. Stainless steel cabinet and thermostatic mixing valve are optional. It measures 6" ? 6" ? 4". The Leonard AU-100 Audio Visual High-Temperature Alarm is list priced at $245 each, reach to install. Quantity discounts are offered.

Contact: Leonard Valve Company, Gregory L. Wilcox, Assistant Sales Manager. 1360 Elmwood Ave., Cranston, RI 02910. 401/461-1200.

10.3928/0098-9134-19810401-16

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