Journal of Gerontological Nursing

More than Dispensing

Virginia E Taylor, RN, MSN

Abstract

More than Dispensing by Cyrelle K. Gerson. American Pharmaceutical Assn., 1980.

More than Dispensing should be on the professional reading list of every administrator and director of nurses working in a long-term care facility (LTCF). This book develops the pharmacist's role in both the drug dispensing and nondispensing services in a LTCF.

Dispensing services include receipt of drug orders, maintenance of patient medication profiles, labeling and dispensing of drug orders, delivery, storage, and accountability of dispensing. Nondispensing services encompass drug regime review, committee participation, inservice education for staff, patient counseling, and establishing of drug policies and procedure.

Models for drug dispensing by an on-premise pharmacist and a^ community pharmacist are reviewed. The discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each system should assist LTCF administrators in making the best choices for their own institutions.

The joint statement of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the American Health Care Association on pharmaceutical service in a LTCF can be found in the appendix. These standards will enable LTCF administrators to organize legal and quality drug services for their residents. The appendix also provides information about sources of equipment and supplies.

The medication nurse will find Chapters Three and Four (Dispensing Service and Non-Dispensing Service) helpful in understanding the components of a written drug order, the importance of a patient drug profile, and the latest methods in drug dispensing. The "eight rights" of drug administration are stated, and a system for identifying drug errors is suggested.

The first chapter would be of interest to anyone in a geriatric practice. There is a concise explanation of the placement of the LTCF in the health delivery system and the definition of levels of care as delineated by Aspen, Medicare and Medicaid, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, and the National Home Survey.

This book was written primarily as a "how to do it" manual for pharmacists; therefore it is very technically and procedurally oriented. Chapters Five and Six (Planning and Implementation) are repetitious. However, the worksheets and forms suggested could be helpful tools in evaluating the pharmacist's role and functions in a LTCF.

For the busy professional who is skimming the book, the gray boxed bold print synopses are meaningful insights into pharmacists' responsibilities in a LTCF.

More than Dispensing provides a method of organizing, implementing and evaluating a pharmaceutical service in a LTCF.…

More than Dispensing by Cyrelle K. Gerson. American Pharmaceutical Assn., 1980.

More than Dispensing should be on the professional reading list of every administrator and director of nurses working in a long-term care facility (LTCF). This book develops the pharmacist's role in both the drug dispensing and nondispensing services in a LTCF.

Dispensing services include receipt of drug orders, maintenance of patient medication profiles, labeling and dispensing of drug orders, delivery, storage, and accountability of dispensing. Nondispensing services encompass drug regime review, committee participation, inservice education for staff, patient counseling, and establishing of drug policies and procedure.

Models for drug dispensing by an on-premise pharmacist and a^ community pharmacist are reviewed. The discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each system should assist LTCF administrators in making the best choices for their own institutions.

The joint statement of the American Pharmaceutical Association and the American Health Care Association on pharmaceutical service in a LTCF can be found in the appendix. These standards will enable LTCF administrators to organize legal and quality drug services for their residents. The appendix also provides information about sources of equipment and supplies.

The medication nurse will find Chapters Three and Four (Dispensing Service and Non-Dispensing Service) helpful in understanding the components of a written drug order, the importance of a patient drug profile, and the latest methods in drug dispensing. The "eight rights" of drug administration are stated, and a system for identifying drug errors is suggested.

The first chapter would be of interest to anyone in a geriatric practice. There is a concise explanation of the placement of the LTCF in the health delivery system and the definition of levels of care as delineated by Aspen, Medicare and Medicaid, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, and the National Home Survey.

This book was written primarily as a "how to do it" manual for pharmacists; therefore it is very technically and procedurally oriented. Chapters Five and Six (Planning and Implementation) are repetitious. However, the worksheets and forms suggested could be helpful tools in evaluating the pharmacist's role and functions in a LTCF.

For the busy professional who is skimming the book, the gray boxed bold print synopses are meaningful insights into pharmacists' responsibilities in a LTCF.

More than Dispensing provides a method of organizing, implementing and evaluating a pharmaceutical service in a LTCF.

10.3928/0098-9134-19810401-13

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents