Journal of Gerontological Nursing

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Analysis for Action Nursing Care of the Elderly

Barbara A Moehrlin, RN, MS

Abstract

Analysis for Action Nursing Care of the Elderly, by Shirley R. Good, RN EdD and Susan S. Rodgers, RN, MS. New York, Prentice-Hall, 1980.

This book is basically a nursing text intended primarily for upper division baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs. It can also be useful to practicing nurses during continuing education and inservice programs or to use as a model for case conferences.

The format of the book consists of several authentic case histories that depict complex client situations. This approach requires the reader to apply a variety of problemsolving techniques in order to analyze the cases and identify solutions. Specific resolutions for each case are not provided; rather a series of study guide questions is listed at the end of each case history. In addition a list of general study guide questions and suggested references is included in the appendix to assist the reader in analysis of the cases. While the suggested references in the appendix are comprehensive, most students are handicapped for time. Therefore it would have been beneficial to have the suggested readings at the end of each chapter, emphasizing important references, rather than at the end of the book.

The introductory chapter of this book describes the ideal characteristics of a qualified gerontological nurse specialist, including educational preparation and expected areas of competence in a variety of settings. A theoretical framework delineating the problem-solving and thinking process approach to the case history method is outlined and offered as one means of educating gerontology clinical nurse specialists.

Twelve case histories follow. These represent a variety of clients and settings that include elderly men and women ranging in age from 60 to 93, and representing caucasions of numerous cultural backgrounds, black, and hispanic ethnic groups. However, all men included were white, and there was only one case in which the main character was over the age of 85. The themes and foci of the case histories are relevant and thought-provoking and consist of a complexity of problems. Each case contains a number of components that characterize physical, social, emotional, spiritual, economic, environmental, and occupational aspects of the history. Several situations also provide data from physical assessments, diagnostic studies, and referral forms.

The manner in which the role of the hospital nurse was portrayed was disappointing. While it is understandable that the authors were trying to present authentic material, the cases cited would have the reader believe that the hospital nurse rarely provides sufficient data to facilitate a problem-solving approach.

Nevertheless, Analysis for Action presents the reader with a realistic approach to problem analysis and resolution through use of the case method. The histories are genuine and will provide students with vicarious experiences in learning to care for elderly persons.

This is one of few recent texts to recognize the value of the gerontological nurse specialist in a variety of community settings.…

Analysis for Action Nursing Care of the Elderly, by Shirley R. Good, RN EdD and Susan S. Rodgers, RN, MS. New York, Prentice-Hall, 1980.

This book is basically a nursing text intended primarily for upper division baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs. It can also be useful to practicing nurses during continuing education and inservice programs or to use as a model for case conferences.

The format of the book consists of several authentic case histories that depict complex client situations. This approach requires the reader to apply a variety of problemsolving techniques in order to analyze the cases and identify solutions. Specific resolutions for each case are not provided; rather a series of study guide questions is listed at the end of each case history. In addition a list of general study guide questions and suggested references is included in the appendix to assist the reader in analysis of the cases. While the suggested references in the appendix are comprehensive, most students are handicapped for time. Therefore it would have been beneficial to have the suggested readings at the end of each chapter, emphasizing important references, rather than at the end of the book.

The introductory chapter of this book describes the ideal characteristics of a qualified gerontological nurse specialist, including educational preparation and expected areas of competence in a variety of settings. A theoretical framework delineating the problem-solving and thinking process approach to the case history method is outlined and offered as one means of educating gerontology clinical nurse specialists.

Twelve case histories follow. These represent a variety of clients and settings that include elderly men and women ranging in age from 60 to 93, and representing caucasions of numerous cultural backgrounds, black, and hispanic ethnic groups. However, all men included were white, and there was only one case in which the main character was over the age of 85. The themes and foci of the case histories are relevant and thought-provoking and consist of a complexity of problems. Each case contains a number of components that characterize physical, social, emotional, spiritual, economic, environmental, and occupational aspects of the history. Several situations also provide data from physical assessments, diagnostic studies, and referral forms.

The manner in which the role of the hospital nurse was portrayed was disappointing. While it is understandable that the authors were trying to present authentic material, the cases cited would have the reader believe that the hospital nurse rarely provides sufficient data to facilitate a problem-solving approach.

Nevertheless, Analysis for Action presents the reader with a realistic approach to problem analysis and resolution through use of the case method. The histories are genuine and will provide students with vicarious experiences in learning to care for elderly persons.

This is one of few recent texts to recognize the value of the gerontological nurse specialist in a variety of community settings.

10.3928/0098-9134-19810301-10

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