Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Publications 

Primary Health Care of the Older Adult

Sandra J Frank, RN, MN

Abstract

Primary Health Care of the Older Adult by May Futrell, Stephen Brovender, Elizabeth McKinnon-MuIlett, and H. Terri Brower, North Scituate, Massachusetts, Duxbury Press.

On the plus side of this book, I found if to be presented in a clear and legible type. In addition, the drawings at the beginning of each chapter are attractive, pleasant, and interesting as a way of introduction to the chapter. The table of contents breaks down in sections that make for easy access and reference when a specific entity is needed in relation to either the nursing process or nursing management of the gerontological person.

In the beginning of the book there are several typographical spelling errors that are glaring and annoying to the reader. At first this was a distraction when reading for content, but later on I was able to overlook these mistakes while obtaining content meaning.

The summary at the end of each chapter is superfluous and noninformative. A summary is usually provided in order that the reader can glean important comprehensive facts and serves as a memory refresher for those who have read the preceding information, or as a reference for the reader who wants some basics before challenging all the verbage that precedes. These summaries do neither.

At times there are cursory presentations or explanations leaving the reader frustrated for completion. It seems to be a writing style to briefly mention names and dates without enhancing the topic, eg, on page 9, a statement is made... "The work of some of these investigators is briefly discussed by Kimmel {1974, pp. 346-356)." I would like to see such sentences deleted and just left in the bibliography or reference section.

The references at the end of each chapter are extensive and very complete as well as being current. The same can be said for the index at the end of the book. I question the listing of authors and page numbers from the standpoint of why they are needed, however, they do make for easy and quick reference The last section on community resources is exceptionally helpful, thorough, and timely, adding to the nurse's repetoire of effective patient care.

Primary Health Care of the Older Adult gives a clear understanding and approach to nursing care by presenting the how to'.s of a complete health history and performing a thorough physical examination. The book is comprehensive and guides you through the mechanics and analysis of findings to health assessment.

Each chapter after the first section follows the nursing process system of problem-solving. When presenting nursing management, the format is relatively easy to follow and is presented in logical sequence. The nursing management section (III) offers pertinent, anatomical, physiological, and pathological considerations.

Essentially the book builds on basic knowledge, skill, and experience of the individual reader. It fosters an atmosphere that stimulates intellectual endeavers, creative thinking, and selfunderstanding. It does emphasize the necessity of treating the whole person and includes techniques for gathering sociological, cultural, and psychological data base and provides a complete review of all body systems.

The information on patient interviews and physical examination is current and up-to-date. While presenting the pathophysiology of a disease process, there is stress on the recognition of normal status and common abnormalities rather than disease assessment only. Throughout each presentation there is an underlying stress on prevention and early rehabilitation.

Problems specific to aging are presented and dealt with using a systematicsystems approach, eg, cardiovascular disorders, respiratory disorders, dermatológica! problems, etc. The clinical problems are presented in terms of causes, manifestations, possible complications, treatment and nursing management, and health teaching/patient education.

The book verbally illustrates and…

Primary Health Care of the Older Adult by May Futrell, Stephen Brovender, Elizabeth McKinnon-MuIlett, and H. Terri Brower, North Scituate, Massachusetts, Duxbury Press.

On the plus side of this book, I found if to be presented in a clear and legible type. In addition, the drawings at the beginning of each chapter are attractive, pleasant, and interesting as a way of introduction to the chapter. The table of contents breaks down in sections that make for easy access and reference when a specific entity is needed in relation to either the nursing process or nursing management of the gerontological person.

In the beginning of the book there are several typographical spelling errors that are glaring and annoying to the reader. At first this was a distraction when reading for content, but later on I was able to overlook these mistakes while obtaining content meaning.

The summary at the end of each chapter is superfluous and noninformative. A summary is usually provided in order that the reader can glean important comprehensive facts and serves as a memory refresher for those who have read the preceding information, or as a reference for the reader who wants some basics before challenging all the verbage that precedes. These summaries do neither.

At times there are cursory presentations or explanations leaving the reader frustrated for completion. It seems to be a writing style to briefly mention names and dates without enhancing the topic, eg, on page 9, a statement is made... "The work of some of these investigators is briefly discussed by Kimmel {1974, pp. 346-356)." I would like to see such sentences deleted and just left in the bibliography or reference section.

The references at the end of each chapter are extensive and very complete as well as being current. The same can be said for the index at the end of the book. I question the listing of authors and page numbers from the standpoint of why they are needed, however, they do make for easy and quick reference The last section on community resources is exceptionally helpful, thorough, and timely, adding to the nurse's repetoire of effective patient care.

Primary Health Care of the Older Adult gives a clear understanding and approach to nursing care by presenting the how to'.s of a complete health history and performing a thorough physical examination. The book is comprehensive and guides you through the mechanics and analysis of findings to health assessment.

Each chapter after the first section follows the nursing process system of problem-solving. When presenting nursing management, the format is relatively easy to follow and is presented in logical sequence. The nursing management section (III) offers pertinent, anatomical, physiological, and pathological considerations.

Essentially the book builds on basic knowledge, skill, and experience of the individual reader. It fosters an atmosphere that stimulates intellectual endeavers, creative thinking, and selfunderstanding. It does emphasize the necessity of treating the whole person and includes techniques for gathering sociological, cultural, and psychological data base and provides a complete review of all body systems.

The information on patient interviews and physical examination is current and up-to-date. While presenting the pathophysiology of a disease process, there is stress on the recognition of normal status and common abnormalities rather than disease assessment only. Throughout each presentation there is an underlying stress on prevention and early rehabilitation.

Problems specific to aging are presented and dealt with using a systematicsystems approach, eg, cardiovascular disorders, respiratory disorders, dermatológica! problems, etc. The clinical problems are presented in terms of causes, manifestations, possible complications, treatment and nursing management, and health teaching/patient education.

The book verbally illustrates and reviews decline and changes in functional capacities that are associated with aging and presents techniques for enhancing the abilities of the older person for effective functioning and maximum independence. Overall this book prepares the nurse to meet and understand important considerations in the total health care needs of the elderly. It certainly should be included in the libraries of those nurses whose special interest is in gerontology.

10.3928/0098-9134-19800801-17

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents