Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Meet Your Leaders

Abstract

Doris R. Schwartz Selected 1980 Recipient of Pearl Mclver Award

Doris R, Schwartz, MA, RN, FAAN, was selected as the 1980 recipient of the American Nurses' Association Pearl Mclver Public Health Nurse Award. ANA President Barbara Nichols pre-* sented the award to Ms. Schwartz during special ceremonies on June 10, 1980 during the ANA convention in Houston, Texas.

Ms. Schwartz began her career in public health nursing as a staff nurse with the Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn. From 1951 through the present time, she has worked with Cornell University-New York Hospital. She has held numerous positions during that time, including nurse consultant to the Cornell-Navajo Field Health Research Project in Arizona, preparing indigenous Navajo home health aides. Ms. Schwartz is presently an instructor in the Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program.

A prolific writer on the subjects of public health nursing and gerontology, Ms. Schwartz has co-authored five books and has written numerous journal articles. Her national and international involvement in nursing and health care includes membership on the Advisory Committee on Nursing of the World Health Organization, in the National League for Nursing, the American Geriatric Society, and the American Public Health Association. She is a charter fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, and a member of Sigma Thêta Tau, the national honor society of nursing.

Ms. Schwartz received her diploma in nursing from the Methodist Hospital School of Nursing in Brooklyn, New York. After graduation, she served a four-year tour of duty with the Army Nufse Corps and was discharged at the rank of captain. She obtained her baccalaureate and masters degrees in public health nursing from the New York University School of Nursing and has engaged in postmaster's studies in epidemiology, gerontology, and nurse practitioner education.

The Pearl Mclver Public Health Nurse Award was established in 1956 to honor Ms. Mclver, the first chief of public health nursing of the United States Public Health Service. The award is presented to a public health nurse who has made ou tstanding professional contributions to public health.

Announcing the award winner, ANA President Barbara Nichols commented "Doris Schwartz is a testimony to excellence in public health nursing. She has devoted herself to quality health câre for all people and affirmed, through her energy, insights, and commitment, the role of nursing in public health promotion."

Four Honored for Contributions

On May 29, the National Institute on Aging and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation honored four individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the advancement of the field of aging. The honors were given at a reception on the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the National Advisory Council on Aging, in conjunction with a scientific meeting being cosponsored by the Macy Foundation and thç National Institute on Aging, part oí the National Institutes of Health.

The first meeting of the Advisory Council five years ago was a landmark in thé development of the NIA. The Advisory Council meets three times each year to review applications from scientists seeking financial support from the NIA and consults with and makes recommendations to the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (formerly. HEW) and the directors of the NIA and the NIH on programs related to the aged and the study of aging.

Those being honored on this occasion are:

Nathan Wetherell Shock, "for contributions to the science of gerontology, especially as they relate to his significant role as progenitor of the National Institute on Aging." Dr. Shock was formerly director of the NIA Gerontology Research Center and is currently a National Institutes of Health scientist emeritus at NIA.

Florence Stephenson Mahoney,…

Doris R. Schwartz Selected 1980 Recipient of Pearl Mclver Award

Doris R, Schwartz, MA, RN, FAAN, was selected as the 1980 recipient of the American Nurses' Association Pearl Mclver Public Health Nurse Award. ANA President Barbara Nichols pre-* sented the award to Ms. Schwartz during special ceremonies on June 10, 1980 during the ANA convention in Houston, Texas.

Ms. Schwartz began her career in public health nursing as a staff nurse with the Visiting Nurse Association of Brooklyn. From 1951 through the present time, she has worked with Cornell University-New York Hospital. She has held numerous positions during that time, including nurse consultant to the Cornell-Navajo Field Health Research Project in Arizona, preparing indigenous Navajo home health aides. Ms. Schwartz is presently an instructor in the Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program.

A prolific writer on the subjects of public health nursing and gerontology, Ms. Schwartz has co-authored five books and has written numerous journal articles. Her national and international involvement in nursing and health care includes membership on the Advisory Committee on Nursing of the World Health Organization, in the National League for Nursing, the American Geriatric Society, and the American Public Health Association. She is a charter fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, and a member of Sigma Thêta Tau, the national honor society of nursing.

Ms. Schwartz received her diploma in nursing from the Methodist Hospital School of Nursing in Brooklyn, New York. After graduation, she served a four-year tour of duty with the Army Nufse Corps and was discharged at the rank of captain. She obtained her baccalaureate and masters degrees in public health nursing from the New York University School of Nursing and has engaged in postmaster's studies in epidemiology, gerontology, and nurse practitioner education.

The Pearl Mclver Public Health Nurse Award was established in 1956 to honor Ms. Mclver, the first chief of public health nursing of the United States Public Health Service. The award is presented to a public health nurse who has made ou tstanding professional contributions to public health.

Announcing the award winner, ANA President Barbara Nichols commented "Doris Schwartz is a testimony to excellence in public health nursing. She has devoted herself to quality health câre for all people and affirmed, through her energy, insights, and commitment, the role of nursing in public health promotion."

Four Honored for Contributions

On May 29, the National Institute on Aging and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation honored four individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the advancement of the field of aging. The honors were given at a reception on the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the National Advisory Council on Aging, in conjunction with a scientific meeting being cosponsored by the Macy Foundation and thç National Institute on Aging, part oí the National Institutes of Health.

The first meeting of the Advisory Council five years ago was a landmark in thé development of the NIA. The Advisory Council meets three times each year to review applications from scientists seeking financial support from the NIA and consults with and makes recommendations to the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (formerly. HEW) and the directors of the NIA and the NIH on programs related to the aged and the study of aging.

Those being honored on this occasion are:

Nathan Wetherell Shock, "for contributions to the science of gerontology, especially as they relate to his significant role as progenitor of the National Institute on Aging." Dr. Shock was formerly director of the NIA Gerontology Research Center and is currently a National Institutes of Health scientist emeritus at NIA.

Florence Stephenson Mahoney, "for achievements as a private citizen in shaping national health science policy, particularly with respect to the Creation of the National Institute on Aging." In addition to being a charter member of the National Advisory Council on Aging, Ms. Mahoney has served on the President's Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke; the National Advisory Mental Health Council; the National Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases Advisory Council; and the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council.

The Honorable Thomas Francis Eagleton, "in recognition of his key role in the United States Senate in the sponsorship and passage of the Research on Aging Act, establishing the National Institute on Aging." Senator Eagleton has represented Missouri since 1968 and has served on a number of Senate committees, including chairing thesubcommittee on aging of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

The Honorable Paul Grant Rogers, "in recognition of his key role in the United States House of Representatives in the sponsorship and passage of the Research on Aging Act, establishing the National Institute on Aging." Mr. Rogers served for 24 years in the House of Representatives and for eight years was chairman of the House Subcommittee on Health and the Environment. Many major pieces of health legislation bear his name. He is currently a partner in the law firm of Hogan and Hartson.

10.3928/0098-9134-19801001-05

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents