Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Readers Respond

Abstract

The "Readers Respond" column is designed to give you, our readers, a chance to respond to a particular article, ask a question of an author or Editorial Board member, or speak out about the Journal and care of the elderly in general. We will offer authors the opportunity to respond to criticism and/or questions that may be generated by their articles. Both the response and the original letter will be published in the same issue. If you wish to share your comments with our readers, please send your letter to the J O URN AL OF GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING, Charles B. Slack, Inc., 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, New Jersey 08086.

Dear Ms. Stilwell:

First, the good news. I find the Journal of Gerontological Nursing to be a well-written magazine, intuned to the needs of those in long-term care. I'm delighted to find it is not just advertisements as many such publications are.

Now, the bad news. I have received March and April issues. The cover photography has been outstanding, yet both issues have been marred by the mailing label being stamped directly on the photograph. In both instances the elderly person, the very focus of the picture, is covered by the label. I find this practice very disappointing.

Secondly, several places in the magazine the term, "patient," is used. One of the most important goals I feel geriatric professionals have is to communicate the principle that "old" does not mean "ill," and therefore, the term "patient" is not acceptable in long-term care. We work in nursing homes with RESIDENTS of those homes, not patients. Am I only grumbling over semantics?- I don't think so. I feel your publication should reflect the proper philosophy.

Sincerely yours,

Carol Stei'ens, RN

Vice President

Health Related Services, Inc.

Prairie Village, Kansas

Dear Editor:

I have just received and read my first issue (March 1980) of your journal and would like to comment upon it.

1 was sorry to see the editorial by Sister Rose Therese Bahr reiterating the entryinto-practice issue. Does the expanded nursing role mean only that we have extended the boundaries of our bickering? We need all our practitioners regardless of preparation. We also need degree education at every level of nursing. Let's support each other!

"Elements promoting satisfaction" did not tell me anything I don't already know. I can lyiderstand why such a study would be done; but I don't think it contributed any new knowledge to the field of gerontology.

"Using 24-Hour Reality Orientation" also did not present anything new. It did, however, give practical suggestions and could serve to motivate professionals discouraged and classroom reality orientation.

"In Pursuit of ANA Certification in Gerontological Nursing" was helpful and informative.

"Utilizing Roy's Adaptation Model from a Gerontological Perspective" was excellent. Please print more similar articles. This kind of article will help me define my practice and develop a philosophy of "nurse practitioning."

"Helping Families Cope" was also excellent. It gave concrete guidelines for family counseling, particularly in an ECF setting.

"Social Ecology of Long-Term Care Facilities" was good. I only wish the instrument had been reproduced for future studies and or evaluation.

"Thoughts on Aging" could only have been printed in a professional nursing journal in error. I cannot believe this article survived your peer review. The content reflects total unfamiliarity with institutions and personnel dealing with the aged. The errors are too basic to be enumerated.

I object strongly to advertising for Chloresium and Derifil. Odor can be controlled by good housekeeping and laundry practices if nursing care is adequate. If nursing care is inadequate, nothing will control odor.

Sincerely,

Deborah…

The "Readers Respond" column is designed to give you, our readers, a chance to respond to a particular article, ask a question of an author or Editorial Board member, or speak out about the Journal and care of the elderly in general. We will offer authors the opportunity to respond to criticism and/or questions that may be generated by their articles. Both the response and the original letter will be published in the same issue. If you wish to share your comments with our readers, please send your letter to the J O URN AL OF GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING, Charles B. Slack, Inc., 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, New Jersey 08086.

Dear Ms. Stilwell:

First, the good news. I find the Journal of Gerontological Nursing to be a well-written magazine, intuned to the needs of those in long-term care. I'm delighted to find it is not just advertisements as many such publications are.

Now, the bad news. I have received March and April issues. The cover photography has been outstanding, yet both issues have been marred by the mailing label being stamped directly on the photograph. In both instances the elderly person, the very focus of the picture, is covered by the label. I find this practice very disappointing.

Secondly, several places in the magazine the term, "patient," is used. One of the most important goals I feel geriatric professionals have is to communicate the principle that "old" does not mean "ill," and therefore, the term "patient" is not acceptable in long-term care. We work in nursing homes with RESIDENTS of those homes, not patients. Am I only grumbling over semantics?- I don't think so. I feel your publication should reflect the proper philosophy.

Sincerely yours,

Carol Stei'ens, RN

Vice President

Health Related Services, Inc.

Prairie Village, Kansas

Dear Editor:

I have just received and read my first issue (March 1980) of your journal and would like to comment upon it.

1 was sorry to see the editorial by Sister Rose Therese Bahr reiterating the entryinto-practice issue. Does the expanded nursing role mean only that we have extended the boundaries of our bickering? We need all our practitioners regardless of preparation. We also need degree education at every level of nursing. Let's support each other!

"Elements promoting satisfaction" did not tell me anything I don't already know. I can lyiderstand why such a study would be done; but I don't think it contributed any new knowledge to the field of gerontology.

"Using 24-Hour Reality Orientation" also did not present anything new. It did, however, give practical suggestions and could serve to motivate professionals discouraged and classroom reality orientation.

"In Pursuit of ANA Certification in Gerontological Nursing" was helpful and informative.

"Utilizing Roy's Adaptation Model from a Gerontological Perspective" was excellent. Please print more similar articles. This kind of article will help me define my practice and develop a philosophy of "nurse practitioning."

"Helping Families Cope" was also excellent. It gave concrete guidelines for family counseling, particularly in an ECF setting.

"Social Ecology of Long-Term Care Facilities" was good. I only wish the instrument had been reproduced for future studies and or evaluation.

"Thoughts on Aging" could only have been printed in a professional nursing journal in error. I cannot believe this article survived your peer review. The content reflects total unfamiliarity with institutions and personnel dealing with the aged. The errors are too basic to be enumerated.

I object strongly to advertising for Chloresium and Derifil. Odor can be controlled by good housekeeping and laundry practices if nursing care is adequate. If nursing care is inadequate, nothing will control odor.

Sincerely,

Deborah Wright Berger, R,\, G\'P

Lauderhill, Florida

10.3928/0098-9134-19801001-02

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