Journal of Gerontological Nursing

A NEW YEAR FOR GERONTOLOGICAL NURING

Edna Stilwell, RN, MS

Abstract

The beginning of a new year is a most appropriate time to reflect on where we've been and where we're going. Án indication of where we're going is the First National Symposium in Gerontological Nursing which is scheduled for January 29-31 in Miami, Florida under the sponsorship of the University of Miami School of Nursing. A symposium of this type provides the opportunity for leaders in gerontological nursing to reflect on and share the progress that has been made. Thus, we have not made excuses that we are too busy practicing nursing to pause and take a look at our practice. We see gerontological nursing developing a distinct identity that will soon assure its long overdue placé in professional nursing.

What makes a meeting, of course, are the people who attend it and gerontological nurses are very special people, willing to stand up and be counted, willing to take risks and to explore new directions. The new year also reminds us of the resolutions that are in order. There is still much to be accomplished. But to all of my colleagues in gerontological nursing, and especially, our readers, authors, and Editorial Board, I say,

"Thank you for the significant accomplishments that you have made to improve the health status of older people." Happy New Year!…

The beginning of a new year is a most appropriate time to reflect on where we've been and where we're going. Án indication of where we're going is the First National Symposium in Gerontological Nursing which is scheduled for January 29-31 in Miami, Florida under the sponsorship of the University of Miami School of Nursing. A symposium of this type provides the opportunity for leaders in gerontological nursing to reflect on and share the progress that has been made. Thus, we have not made excuses that we are too busy practicing nursing to pause and take a look at our practice. We see gerontological nursing developing a distinct identity that will soon assure its long overdue placé in professional nursing.

What makes a meeting, of course, are the people who attend it and gerontological nurses are very special people, willing to stand up and be counted, willing to take risks and to explore new directions. The new year also reminds us of the resolutions that are in order. There is still much to be accomplished. But to all of my colleagues in gerontological nursing, and especially, our readers, authors, and Editorial Board, I say,

"Thank you for the significant accomplishments that you have made to improve the health status of older people." Happy New Year!

10.3928/0098-9134-19790101-03

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