Original Article 

Structured Coaching Programs to Develop Staff

Susan MacLeod Dyess, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, NE-BC, HWNC-BC; Rose Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN; Andra Opalinski, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC; Terry Eggenberger, PhD, RN, CNE, CNL, NEA-BC

Abstract

Health care environments are complex and chaotic, therein challenging patients and professionals to attain satisfaction, well-being, and exceptional outcomes. These chaotic environments increase the stress and burnout of professionals and reduce the likelihood of optimizing success in many dimensions. Coaching is evolving as a professional skill that may influence the optimization of the health care environment. This article reflects on three coaching programs: Gallup Strengths-Based Coaching, Dartmouth Microsystem Coaching, and Health and Wellness Nurse Coaching. Each approach is presented, processes and outcomes are considered, and implications for educators are offered. Continuing education departments may recognize various coaching approaches as opportunities to support staff professionals achieve not only the triple aim, but also the quadruple aim.

J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):373–378.

Authors

Dr. Dyess is Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, and Board Certified Nurse Coach, College of Nursing, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, Texas; Dr. Sherman is Professor of Nursing, Program Coordinator for Nursing Administration and Financial Leadership, and Certified Gallup Strengths Coach, Dr. Opalinski is Assistant Professor and Board Certified Nurse Coach, and Dr. Eggenberger is Associate Professor and Credentialed Microsystem Coach, Level 1, Dartmouth Microsystem Academy, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Susan MacLeod Dyess, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, NE-BC, HWNC-BC, Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, and Board Certified Nurse Coach, College of Nursing, Texas A&M University, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412; e-mail: Susan.dyess@tamucc.edu.

Received: December 14, 2016
Accepted: March 20, 2017

10.3928/00220124-20170712-10

Health care environments are complex and chaotic, therein challenging patients and professionals to attain satisfaction, well-being, and exceptional outcomes. These chaotic environments increase the stress and burnout of professionals and reduce the likelihood of optimizing success in many dimensions. Coaching is evolving as a professional skill that may influence the optimization of the health care environment. This article reflects on three coaching programs: Gallup Strengths-Based Coaching, Dartmouth Microsystem Coaching, and Health and Wellness Nurse Coaching. Each approach is presented, processes and outcomes are considered, and implications for educators are offered. Continuing education departments may recognize various coaching approaches as opportunities to support staff professionals achieve not only the triple aim, but also the quadruple aim.

J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):373–378.

Dr. Dyess is Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, and Board Certified Nurse Coach, College of Nursing, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, Texas; Dr. Sherman is Professor of Nursing, Program Coordinator for Nursing Administration and Financial Leadership, and Certified Gallup Strengths Coach, Dr. Opalinski is Assistant Professor and Board Certified Nurse Coach, and Dr. Eggenberger is Associate Professor and Credentialed Microsystem Coach, Level 1, Dartmouth Microsystem Academy, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Susan MacLeod Dyess, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, NE-BC, HWNC-BC, Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, and Board Certified Nurse Coach, College of Nursing, Texas A&M University, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412; e-mail: Susan.dyess@tamucc.edu.

Received: December 14, 2016
Accepted: March 20, 2017
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