Original Article 

Development and Implementation of an Educational Module to Increase Nurses' Comfort With Spiritual Care in an Inpatient Setting

Sara L. Hubbell, DNP, RN, NP-C; Elaine Kauschinger, PhD, ARNP, FNP-BC; Marilyn Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

Abstract

Increasing focus is being placed on providing spiritual care for patients as a component of holistic nursing care. Studies indicate that patients whose spiritual needs are met report higher quality of and satisfaction with their care. However, nurses are not including spiritual assessment and care into their practice. One barrier cited by nurses is that they lack educational preparation. A 2-hour, face-to-face educational module about the provision of spiritual care was implemented for inpatient nursing staff at a large academic medical center. Program evaluations of the module suggested an increase in the comfort of nurses providing spiritual care. This article describes the development and implementation of this educational program, with preliminary results.

J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):358–364.

Authors

Dr. Hubbell is Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. Kauschinger is Assistant Professor and Dr. Oermann is Thelma M. Ingles Professor of Nursing and Director, Evaluation and Educational Research, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

The authors thank Dr. Mary Tonges and Ms. Alyson Breisch for their support of this work.

Address correspondence to Sara L. Hubbell, DNP, RN, NP-C, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 4106 Carrington Hall, CB #7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460; e-mail: sara.hubbell@unc.edu.

Received: December 19, 2016
Accepted: April 25, 2017

10.3928/00220124-20170712-07

Increasing focus is being placed on providing spiritual care for patients as a component of holistic nursing care. Studies indicate that patients whose spiritual needs are met report higher quality of and satisfaction with their care. However, nurses are not including spiritual assessment and care into their practice. One barrier cited by nurses is that they lack educational preparation. A 2-hour, face-to-face educational module about the provision of spiritual care was implemented for inpatient nursing staff at a large academic medical center. Program evaluations of the module suggested an increase in the comfort of nurses providing spiritual care. This article describes the development and implementation of this educational program, with preliminary results.

J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):358–364.

Dr. Hubbell is Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. Kauschinger is Assistant Professor and Dr. Oermann is Thelma M. Ingles Professor of Nursing and Director, Evaluation and Educational Research, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

The authors thank Dr. Mary Tonges and Ms. Alyson Breisch for their support of this work.

Address correspondence to Sara L. Hubbell, DNP, RN, NP-C, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 4106 Carrington Hall, CB #7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460; e-mail: sara.hubbell@unc.edu.

Received: December 19, 2016
Accepted: April 25, 2017
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