The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing

ALTERNATE WAYS OF OFFERING CE 

The Development of a Hospitalwide Computerized Employee and Physician Education Record Keeping System

Deanna Jenkins, RN, MEd; Ron Carter; Bill Howard

Abstract

Our purpose in developing a computerized record keeping system was twofold: to maintain our current education time staff utilization and to provide each department head/head nurse with a detailed record of class attendance.

Beginning with the establishment of a hospitalwide program through the Division of Education in 1973, the Division of Education assumed responsibility for total education record keeping. In the seven-year span, we have increased from 1,050 employees to 1,570 employees plus a medical staff of 300 under an accredited CME program.

Initially, a code was assigned to each education class and the code was hand posted on an individual record card. If an employee wished a copy of the record, it was necessary to refer back to the code book and hand document each class by title. In 1978, the personnel department redesigned the annual evaluation form to include the number of inservice hours and continuing education participation. It became important to not only have a certain number of hours but also that the subject matter was pertinent to the individual employee. The staff time needed to provide a minimal amount of information was becoming prohibitive.

In cooperation with the Data Center, we established the following criteria for a record keeping system. In addition to the program criteria, the system must have the mechanism for implementation, which required minimal class time for the instructors. This was achieved by a slight variation in sign-in sheets to accommodate the employee's hospital number which serves as the computer identification number (Figure).

The program must have the capability of providing the following:

1. Demand print-outs (for physicians, personnel who may need verification of education hours for national accreditation, or for surveys, etc.)

2. Print-outs for annual evaluations

3. Termination lists with print-outs of education hours for terminated employees' files

4. A monthly summary- of classes offered by department/ nursing unit

5. Demand print-outs for selected classes by department/ individual

6. Didactic information - name of program, month, year, and time in minutes

7. Rapid recognition for required special programs, such as CPR Certification, IV and Defibrillation Procedures, etc.

8. Demand print-outs for RNs who need information for out-of-state licensure

9. Retention of information when demand print-outs are needed

This method of keeping education records for approximately 1,500 employees plus 300 physicians requires an estimated eight hours per week. If done manually, the minimum of one full-time person for forty hours a week would be required. The time required by the Data Center averages approximately three hours per week (keypunching, processing reports, etc.).

Data Processing uses RPG-II language for our self-generated software. Initially, input data is placed on floppy discs and then stored on magnetic discs. The hardware used at this time is an IBM System/3, Model 12. When the program is rewritten, a few variations will be made. For instance, it would be helpful to code the number of times the same class is offered on each shift and also code hospital classes considered mandatory in order to call for a listing of employees who had not attended in a given period of time. For example, each month we could be notified of all employees whose CPR certification is outdated. Specific mandatory classes could be programmed for specialty units and would appear on the printed report as deficits if not reviewed annually.

Working with data processing has been an enlightening experience. Division of Education personnel are presently enrolled in a general introductory course in computers so that we are better able to request programs. We are striving to be "informed users."…

Our purpose in developing a computerized record keeping system was twofold: to maintain our current education time staff utilization and to provide each department head/head nurse with a detailed record of class attendance.

Beginning with the establishment of a hospitalwide program through the Division of Education in 1973, the Division of Education assumed responsibility for total education record keeping. In the seven-year span, we have increased from 1,050 employees to 1,570 employees plus a medical staff of 300 under an accredited CME program.

Initially, a code was assigned to each education class and the code was hand posted on an individual record card. If an employee wished a copy of the record, it was necessary to refer back to the code book and hand document each class by title. In 1978, the personnel department redesigned the annual evaluation form to include the number of inservice hours and continuing education participation. It became important to not only have a certain number of hours but also that the subject matter was pertinent to the individual employee. The staff time needed to provide a minimal amount of information was becoming prohibitive.

In cooperation with the Data Center, we established the following criteria for a record keeping system. In addition to the program criteria, the system must have the mechanism for implementation, which required minimal class time for the instructors. This was achieved by a slight variation in sign-in sheets to accommodate the employee's hospital number which serves as the computer identification number (Figure).

The program must have the capability of providing the following:

1. Demand print-outs (for physicians, personnel who may need verification of education hours for national accreditation, or for surveys, etc.)

2. Print-outs for annual evaluations

3. Termination lists with print-outs of education hours for terminated employees' files

4. A monthly summary- of classes offered by department/ nursing unit

5. Demand print-outs for selected classes by department/ individual

6. Didactic information - name of program, month, year, and time in minutes

7. Rapid recognition for required special programs, such as CPR Certification, IV and Defibrillation Procedures, etc.

8. Demand print-outs for RNs who need information for out-of-state licensure

9. Retention of information when demand print-outs are needed

This method of keeping education records for approximately 1,500 employees plus 300 physicians requires an estimated eight hours per week. If done manually, the minimum of one full-time person for forty hours a week would be required. The time required by the Data Center averages approximately three hours per week (keypunching, processing reports, etc.).

Data Processing uses RPG-II language for our self-generated software. Initially, input data is placed on floppy discs and then stored on magnetic discs. The hardware used at this time is an IBM System/3, Model 12. When the program is rewritten, a few variations will be made. For instance, it would be helpful to code the number of times the same class is offered on each shift and also code hospital classes considered mandatory in order to call for a listing of employees who had not attended in a given period of time. For example, each month we could be notified of all employees whose CPR certification is outdated. Specific mandatory classes could be programmed for specialty units and would appear on the printed report as deficits if not reviewed annually.

Working with data processing has been an enlightening experience. Division of Education personnel are presently enrolled in a general introductory course in computers so that we are better able to request programs. We are striving to be "informed users."

FIGURECLASS ATTENDANCE SIGN-IN SHEET

FIGURE

CLASS ATTENDANCE SIGN-IN SHEET

10.3928/0022-0124-19840901-09

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