The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH

Abstract

NIMH AND MENTAL HEALTH MANPOWER

Each year, more psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses, and others are needed to staff hsopitals, to perform research, to teach, and to serve in community mental health centers. An estimated 99,000 trained staff will be needed in 1972 - 31,000 more than the present number available.

One-third of the entire NIMH program is devoted to helping the Nation meet its needs for mental health manpower. In the past twenty years, NlMH supported the training of over 34,000 mental health professionals. The manpower pool increased by forty-four percent between I960 and 1965.

A STATEMENT

Stanley F. Volles, M.D. Director, National Institute of Mental Health has said:

The National Institute of Mental Health administers the Federal Government's major program of support for the Nation's work in mental health. This requires a wide range of activities - in research, in training, in services. NIMH conducts and supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional illnesses and agréât number of public health problems related to mental health, such as drug abuse and alcoholism. // supporta training in the mental health and auxiliary professions to help provide the manpower needed to serve. And it assists States and localities in developing their resources for treating the ill, preventing illness, and strengthening mental health.

Most of the national investment in mental health goes to the States, to institutions and agencies, to universities, hospitals, local mental health programs, and to thousands of individuals across the Nation whose work or study is supported by grants.

Whatever the achievements - the dramatic reduction in numbers confined to mental hospitals, new explanations of man's mind and his behavior - they have been attained in partnership. The national mental health program led by the Institute is a partnership of effort: the effort of the Federal, state, and local governments, of private agencies, of individual scientists, and of concerned and participating citizens. Whatever progress is to be gained further will be gained similarly: through the joint conquest of illness and the continuing pursuit of greater health.

CLEARINGHOUSE

The National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information is to be the world's largest computerized repository of menial health and related research findings.

Because of the tremendous growth of information generated by mental health research and the need to speed the application of research knowledge, scientific exchange is also vital. Professionals must have ready access to the burgeoning information available. The National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information is being developed as a central source for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of scientific and technical reports and data. Through the use of modern computer techniques, the Clearinghouse provides scientific information both upon individual request and in the form of recurring and single tissue publications. It provides scientific analyses and compilations which present an overall view and synthesis of national and international research activities. Publications include "Crime and Delinquency Abstracts," "Psychophar maco logy Abstracts," "Psychopharmacology Bulletin," "Occupational Mental Health Notes," "Drug Dependence and Abuse Notes," The Bulletin of Suicidology, and a subscription journal, Mental Health Digest.

In addition, the Clearinghouse develops and publishes bibliographies in special areas of national concern, such as "Bibliography on the Urban Crisis," "Psychological and Social Aspects of Human Tissue Transplantation," and "International Family Planning."

To reach the National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information, scientists and other professionals may telephone Area code 301, 496-7065. By mail, all units are reached: National Institute of Mental Health, 5454 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20015.

NIMH COMMUNICATIONS

Through the outreach of its Office of Communications, NIMH is in daily contact with the public need for information and…

NIMH AND MENTAL HEALTH MANPOWER

Each year, more psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses, and others are needed to staff hsopitals, to perform research, to teach, and to serve in community mental health centers. An estimated 99,000 trained staff will be needed in 1972 - 31,000 more than the present number available.

One-third of the entire NIMH program is devoted to helping the Nation meet its needs for mental health manpower. In the past twenty years, NlMH supported the training of over 34,000 mental health professionals. The manpower pool increased by forty-four percent between I960 and 1965.

A STATEMENT

Stanley F. Volles, M.D. Director, National Institute of Mental Health has said:

The National Institute of Mental Health administers the Federal Government's major program of support for the Nation's work in mental health. This requires a wide range of activities - in research, in training, in services. NIMH conducts and supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional illnesses and agréât number of public health problems related to mental health, such as drug abuse and alcoholism. // supporta training in the mental health and auxiliary professions to help provide the manpower needed to serve. And it assists States and localities in developing their resources for treating the ill, preventing illness, and strengthening mental health.

Most of the national investment in mental health goes to the States, to institutions and agencies, to universities, hospitals, local mental health programs, and to thousands of individuals across the Nation whose work or study is supported by grants.

Whatever the achievements - the dramatic reduction in numbers confined to mental hospitals, new explanations of man's mind and his behavior - they have been attained in partnership. The national mental health program led by the Institute is a partnership of effort: the effort of the Federal, state, and local governments, of private agencies, of individual scientists, and of concerned and participating citizens. Whatever progress is to be gained further will be gained similarly: through the joint conquest of illness and the continuing pursuit of greater health.

CLEARINGHOUSE

The National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information is to be the world's largest computerized repository of menial health and related research findings.

Because of the tremendous growth of information generated by mental health research and the need to speed the application of research knowledge, scientific exchange is also vital. Professionals must have ready access to the burgeoning information available. The National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information is being developed as a central source for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of scientific and technical reports and data. Through the use of modern computer techniques, the Clearinghouse provides scientific information both upon individual request and in the form of recurring and single tissue publications. It provides scientific analyses and compilations which present an overall view and synthesis of national and international research activities. Publications include "Crime and Delinquency Abstracts," "Psychophar maco logy Abstracts," "Psychopharmacology Bulletin," "Occupational Mental Health Notes," "Drug Dependence and Abuse Notes," The Bulletin of Suicidology, and a subscription journal, Mental Health Digest.

In addition, the Clearinghouse develops and publishes bibliographies in special areas of national concern, such as "Bibliography on the Urban Crisis," "Psychological and Social Aspects of Human Tissue Transplantation," and "International Family Planning."

To reach the National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information, scientists and other professionals may telephone Area code 301, 496-7065. By mail, all units are reached: National Institute of Mental Health, 5454 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20015.

NIMH COMMUNICATIONS

Through the outreach of its Office of Communications, NIMH is in daily contact with the public need for information and education, and with the professional's need for ready access to information that may help to speed the beneficial application of modern research.

To keep the public and the professional community abreast of NIMH programs and developments in mental health, the Office of Communications prepares and distributes material of a broad variety and for all forms of communications media. NIMH responds to many thousands of inquiries from the public and the Nation's news outlets. Information is disseminated through news releases and other information services provided the public and professional press, radio, and television.

Informational and educational publications and films produced by NIMH are distributed throughout the country. These deal with mental health and related problems such as drug abuse, alcoholism, and suicide. Education for prevention of illness and the promotion of mental health is a key function of the national mental health program.

Progress of Federal programs supported by NIMH grants is reported regularly, including the continuing growth and development of the comprehensive community mental health centers program, treatment and rehabilitation of narcotic addicts under the Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act, and research and demonstration programs in the physical and behavioral sciences, which encompass studies in the entire range of man's ordered and disordered behavior.

For inquiries, telephone the NIMH Office of Communications, Area Code 301-496-0477.

Psychiatric Nursing

Psychiatric- men tal health nurses are needed in all types of mental health services. Grants are made to colleges and universities for the undergraduate collegiate training, graduate training, and doctoral training of nurses to work in the field of mental health. Special training in fields critically short of professional nurses is also supported, as well as programs of continuing education.

Continuing Education

Continuing education programs enable many organizations, institutions, and agencies to update the training of their staff and others who serve the mental health needs of their communities. These include lawyers, clergy, teachers, scientists, nurses, aides, childcare workers, various types of therapists, welfare workers, law enforcement officials, and mental health professionals.

Pioneering in Training

Greater service for more people requires more manpower and personnel trained in community practice. New kinds of auxiliary workers are being trained to help stretch the Nation's supply of mental health manpower, and new training is being developed in the traditional mental health professions. NIMH supports unique and experimental training projects, such as the training of mental health counselors and aides in junior colleges, the training of aides in community mental health centers, and mental health training programs for teachers, clergy, police, and others who serve large numbers of peopie. Special training projects also help to provide the skilled personnel needed to serve alcoholics, drug abusers, and delinquents.

NOTE: Some of these workers are instructed in part by nurses, and Junction under the direction of nurses; hence some of their training falls within continuing education in nursing

Other training programs

Several other training support programs include career teaching in the mental health professions, training in public health, and training opportunities for psychiatrists and nurses in the mental health career development program of the Public Health Service.

Hospital Staff Development

Many State hospitals face severe staff shortages. The Institute administers a hospital staff development grants program to help improve the skills and knowledge of hospital staff, particularly those involved in direct care of patients. Staff development grants have helped provide on-the-job training for more than 60,000 psychiatric aides, attendants and other personnel employed in twothirds of the eligible hospitals throughout the Nation. These grants can also cover training for other hospital personnel. For example, in some hospitals, consultants in community mental health conduct courses for staff psychiatrists and psychologists, Hospitals also secure NIMH grants to establish ongoing inservice training programs.

Some hospitals combine training projects and hospital improvement programs. New approaches such as team treatment are dramatically changing conventional hospital service.

HEALTH SERVICES AND MENTAL HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

National Institute of Mental Health

Saint Elizabeths Hospital

Metamorphosis ai Sf. Elizabeths

St. Elizabeths Hospital is a psychiatric center which was created by Congress in 1 855 for the "most humane care and enlightened curative treatment" of the mentally ill. Under a new NIMH program, Saint Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D. C, becomes a National Center for Mental Health Services. It will serve as a national model for the conversion of a large, old-style mental institution into a modern facility, with a community- based mental health center.

Nursing, through its programs and in collaboration with other disciplines, provides psychiatric nursing care for all age groups and classifications of mental patients. Modalities of treatment include many aspects of the group approach to therapy; among those in use are therapeutic community, group psychotherapy, ward living groups, and others such as re-entry and remotivation groups. Nurses have the opportunity to work as team members using a multidisciplinary approach to planning for patient care.

The inservice educational program provides for a six-week orientation for the newly employed nurse, followed by workshop experiences and the opportunity to participate in seminars led by qualified instructional staff.

There is also opportunity for training and experience in a Group Work Training Program. This program is available on two levels; the first, a course for nurses only; the second, multidisciplinary course at a more advanced level.

Nurses employed at St. Elizabeths Hospital have the opportunity for continuing education at the local universities through Training Act funds. There are, of course, necessary requirements to be met if one is to receive such training assistance.

The Nursing Research Section is responsible for planning and conducting research in nursing; making the results available to nursing; and coordinating activities of nursing in research of other disciplines. Members of the research staff participate in educational programs and all other activities are available to them.

Editor's Note: Much of iHe primed materials prepared in Washington are in fact usable guidelines for program planning at any level. The following will be an interesting and productive exercise for those new in program development or grantsmanship. This outline is a brief modified version of grant application instructions designed as a guide for potential grant applicants, for rough draft proposals, or simply for local use in program planning.

Guide For Program Planning and Grant Project Proposals

The outline which follows is meant to suggest comprehensive program planning but not necessarily extensive NIMH grant support. Contributions from students and employers may most easily be gained for support of direct teaching activities. NIMH support may be most strongly indicated for support of program planning and program planning and program administration which the sponsoring institution cannot yet provide. Nonetheless, NIMH support may be requested for any phase of the continuing education program as indicated by local circumstances.

I. Description of Training Program or Project:

a. Historic background and developments leading to the proposal - nature of sponsoring institution or agency, or persons or division responsible for continuing education, previous continuing education activities, relevant needs and resources for. continuing education in geographic and subject areas, participation by other agencies, professional associations or employee groups engaged in planning present proposal, relation of continuing education proposal to State or community mental health plans.

b. Students. Basis for decision as to which types of students will be given highest priority in your continuing education efforts. Nature of student or consumer involvement in planning educational program. Type(s) of students and estimated number to be taught. If multidisciplinary approximate number of each type. Nature and approximate number of all potential students (the"universe"from which actual students will be drawn), plans for recruiting and selecting students, evidence of expressed interest by potential students, plans for followup and diversification of education according to different student backgrounds and needs.

c. Objectives. Describe briefly the goal-setting process as well as objectives reached - wnat information and perspectives were considered, what persons or groups participated in defining the objectives and setting priorities. General objectives include overall continuing education objectives - to help prepare staff for a developing community mental health program, to increase the effectiveness of physicians or clergy in dealing with the mental health aspects of their practices, to meet a high priority manpower need in child mental health, etc. Specific objectives, preferably stated in terms of measurable knowledge, demonstrable skills or behavioral change, should be tailored to specified needs of trainee target groups and mental service priorities - to change specific behavior of public health nurses in Smith County for helping families cope with crises in which a parent has a terminal illness. Specific objectives may also be stated in terms of measurable changes in patients or in mental health indices of the population served by the trainees - reduction in the rate of arrests for alcoholism in the population served by trainees.

d. Methods and Content. Describe methods to be used in each training activity. Indicate rationale for choice of methods as they pertain to specific training objectives, content, available faculty and learning process. Describe the time sequence and total course hours for each training activity. Include a breakdown as to hours per day, days per month, etc., and relate the duration to the content and objectives. Describe the specific content to be included in the proposed program and indicate the relation of the content to the objectives.

e. Available data and future plans for analysis of program development and evaluation of education. Describe any plans for teacher training and critique.

II. Budget items. Give sufficient budget breakdown or formulae used in calculations to make nature of budget clear. List figures in two columns: current year and first year of proposed grant support.

a. Total Budget of Department, Agency or School (exclusive of PHS Grants)

1. Total Budget

2. Estimate of that part of the total budget which is for continuing education.

3. Estimate of that part of the budget which comes from continuing education student registration fees.

4. Estimate of total direct or indirect employer's contribution to the continuing education program in the form of time off, travel, registration fees, etc.

b. Project budget:

1. NIMH support contemplated for the initial budget period (usually twelve months).

2. NIMH support contemplated for the proposed project period (the maximum period for which support may be requested for a new grant is five years).

III. Key staff in Continuing Education.

a. Personnel and their approximate hours per week or year already devoted to continuing education.

b. Personnel and their approximate hours per week or per year in proposed project: Beginning with the program director list names and qualifications of key personnel in the project regardless of expected source of support. For unnamed positions list type of personnel desired.

10.3928/0022-0124-19710101-15

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