The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing

NEW TRAINING AIDS FOR NURSING IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

Abstract

Watch for this to become available commercially:

A new concept in emergency department training is presented in the package, From Rescue to Recovery, which permits total flexibility on the part of the instructor. Designed to improve the quality of patient care in the emergency department, From Rescue to Recovery presents arguments in favor of better staffing, more adequate equipment and supplies, and written and reviewed procedure guidelines.

Composed of a fifty-page book and 153 35mm color slides, the mini-course will provide concise orientation for new emergency department staff, or serve as promotional material for organizations and individuals interested in upgrading total emergency care within the community. Coauthors Anne Russell and Jean Lazar developed a built-in expansion method which allows the hospital instructor to use the slide presentation as a basis for continuing inservice training. All suggested resources, such as films, texts, and training courses, are nationally avaiïable and are documented in a bibliography in the back of the book. Medical and technical information is referenced on each page of the text and is also detailed in the bibliography. The slides are unique by virtue of the fact that actual emergency department scenes replete with desirable equipment and staff are depicted throughout. A cartoon figure, Mr. Hyper T. Cardiobese, created to represent a typical emergency patient, appears intermittently throughout the series, and adds a light touch to the serious subject of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

NOTE; The expansion methodology will be of interest to planners and instructors of continuing education, as well as the content.

Watch for this too!

Another course, Nursing in Disaster, is self-instructional and designed to provide a more effective and uniform course of disaster instruction. It is sufficiently flexible to be used in schools of nursing, but not limited to the confines of the educational institution. Nurses who have been away from practice, as well as those desiring a systematic review will find it useful. Existing materials have been collected from a variety of sources, including the American Red Cross, the Office of Civil Defense, and the Division of Emergency Health Services of the U.S. Public Health Service. Nursing in Disaster covers such topics as the sorting (triage) of mass casualties, the nurse's responsibilities in disaster, and the conditions under which the nurse would function in a major emergency.

The course will be contained in a profusely illustrated book and will be marketed by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Unit testing has been completed; field demonstration is in progress, and the book will be avaüable some time in 1971.

Division of Emergency Health Services

Public Health Service

Health Services and Mental Health Administration

Department of Health, Education and Welfare…

Watch for this to become available commercially:

A new concept in emergency department training is presented in the package, From Rescue to Recovery, which permits total flexibility on the part of the instructor. Designed to improve the quality of patient care in the emergency department, From Rescue to Recovery presents arguments in favor of better staffing, more adequate equipment and supplies, and written and reviewed procedure guidelines.

Composed of a fifty-page book and 153 35mm color slides, the mini-course will provide concise orientation for new emergency department staff, or serve as promotional material for organizations and individuals interested in upgrading total emergency care within the community. Coauthors Anne Russell and Jean Lazar developed a built-in expansion method which allows the hospital instructor to use the slide presentation as a basis for continuing inservice training. All suggested resources, such as films, texts, and training courses, are nationally avaiïable and are documented in a bibliography in the back of the book. Medical and technical information is referenced on each page of the text and is also detailed in the bibliography. The slides are unique by virtue of the fact that actual emergency department scenes replete with desirable equipment and staff are depicted throughout. A cartoon figure, Mr. Hyper T. Cardiobese, created to represent a typical emergency patient, appears intermittently throughout the series, and adds a light touch to the serious subject of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

NOTE; The expansion methodology will be of interest to planners and instructors of continuing education, as well as the content.

Watch for this too!

Another course, Nursing in Disaster, is self-instructional and designed to provide a more effective and uniform course of disaster instruction. It is sufficiently flexible to be used in schools of nursing, but not limited to the confines of the educational institution. Nurses who have been away from practice, as well as those desiring a systematic review will find it useful. Existing materials have been collected from a variety of sources, including the American Red Cross, the Office of Civil Defense, and the Division of Emergency Health Services of the U.S. Public Health Service. Nursing in Disaster covers such topics as the sorting (triage) of mass casualties, the nurse's responsibilities in disaster, and the conditions under which the nurse would function in a major emergency.

The course will be contained in a profusely illustrated book and will be marketed by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Unit testing has been completed; field demonstration is in progress, and the book will be avaüable some time in 1971.

Division of Emergency Health Services

Public Health Service

Health Services and Mental Health Administration

Department of Health, Education and Welfare

10.3928/0022-0124-19710101-16

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