The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing

IT'S NEW WITH JCEN

Abstract

NEWSNOTES

A Telecommunication Conference, conducted by the Health Sciences Unit, University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, was held October 15-16 1970, in Madison, Wisconsin.

The conference presented information about the Wisconsin Telephone Dial Access Library for Physicians and Nurses, and the Educational Telephone/Radio Network as developed by the University. Discussions included uses, production, "and media presentations of the systems, program planning and evaluation, explanation of cooperative arrangements, and the feasibility study to consider an access library undertaken for the National Library of Medicine.

The Telephone Dial Access Library in Wisconsin, funded by the Wisconsin Regional Medical Program, contains over four hundred tapes on medica! and nursing subjects. The tapes, which run five to ten minutes in length, are available to all physicians and nurses in the state. To listen to the tapes, callers dial special toll-free numbers from any telephone within Wisconsin's borders.

The Educational Telephone/Radio Network (ETN/SCA) is used for the transmission of educational materials throughout Wisconsin. ETN is a prívate telephone network with stations located in courthouses, university campuses, and hospitals in over one hundred communities. Each station has identical equipment, a telephone handset and a loudspeaker. The two-day equipment enables a listener at any ETN station to hear anything transmitted on the network as well as to participate in discussions with all points on the network. The ETN system has been operated by University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, since 1965 and transmits an average of one hundred ohours of instruction per week. During the 1969-1970 program year, the Health Sciences Unit is offering 168 courses and conferences; more than eight hundred are presented through the University.

The SCA (Subsidiary Communications Authorization) is a specific function on the FM channel and is created by an electronic technique (multiplexing) which permits an FM station to beam several signals simultaneously.

The Telecommunications Conference was designed for organizations and individuals concerned with health information, continuing education, and the communication media. Mrs. Anne G. Niles, R.N., Coordinator for NURSING DIAL ACCESS, was conference coordinator.

Clinical Conference on Aging

Nurses attending the Fifth Annual Clinical Conference conducted, by the University of Wisconsin's Extension Department of Nursing were told by Dr. Valencia N. Prock, R.N., that aging is a normal process which continues throughout adult life, and should not be equated with sickness.

Dr. Prock, newly-appointed Dean of the School of Nursing, University of WisconsinMadison, spoke to more than one hundred professional nurses in Madison at the Conference on Aging held October 21-22.

"Each person becomes an expert on aging, and the older person is well worth listening to, since he is a rich source of ideas about life," she said. "He has experienced grief and loneliness, and nurses must learn how to handle these emotions by listening to their patients."

Dr. Vivian I. Wood, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin, indicated that fear of illness and medical bills are primary problems of old age. "Three-fourths of the people 65 or over have a chronic disease," she said, "And it is likely that they have lived with it for a long time."

Dr. Wood pointed out that the life span in the United States has not increased, but there are more elderly people living out the expected life span because early childhood diseases have been brought under control. Medical science has not conquered the diseases relating to the causes of death, which she cited as heart disease and cancer.

Dr. Wood said that only four percent of the aged population are in institutions such as nursing homes, general or mental hospitals, and cautioned that nurses should not consider the behavior…

NEWSNOTES

A Telecommunication Conference, conducted by the Health Sciences Unit, University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, was held October 15-16 1970, in Madison, Wisconsin.

The conference presented information about the Wisconsin Telephone Dial Access Library for Physicians and Nurses, and the Educational Telephone/Radio Network as developed by the University. Discussions included uses, production, "and media presentations of the systems, program planning and evaluation, explanation of cooperative arrangements, and the feasibility study to consider an access library undertaken for the National Library of Medicine.

The Telephone Dial Access Library in Wisconsin, funded by the Wisconsin Regional Medical Program, contains over four hundred tapes on medica! and nursing subjects. The tapes, which run five to ten minutes in length, are available to all physicians and nurses in the state. To listen to the tapes, callers dial special toll-free numbers from any telephone within Wisconsin's borders.

The Educational Telephone/Radio Network (ETN/SCA) is used for the transmission of educational materials throughout Wisconsin. ETN is a prívate telephone network with stations located in courthouses, university campuses, and hospitals in over one hundred communities. Each station has identical equipment, a telephone handset and a loudspeaker. The two-day equipment enables a listener at any ETN station to hear anything transmitted on the network as well as to participate in discussions with all points on the network. The ETN system has been operated by University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, since 1965 and transmits an average of one hundred ohours of instruction per week. During the 1969-1970 program year, the Health Sciences Unit is offering 168 courses and conferences; more than eight hundred are presented through the University.

The SCA (Subsidiary Communications Authorization) is a specific function on the FM channel and is created by an electronic technique (multiplexing) which permits an FM station to beam several signals simultaneously.

The Telecommunications Conference was designed for organizations and individuals concerned with health information, continuing education, and the communication media. Mrs. Anne G. Niles, R.N., Coordinator for NURSING DIAL ACCESS, was conference coordinator.

Clinical Conference on Aging

Nurses attending the Fifth Annual Clinical Conference conducted, by the University of Wisconsin's Extension Department of Nursing were told by Dr. Valencia N. Prock, R.N., that aging is a normal process which continues throughout adult life, and should not be equated with sickness.

Dr. Prock, newly-appointed Dean of the School of Nursing, University of WisconsinMadison, spoke to more than one hundred professional nurses in Madison at the Conference on Aging held October 21-22.

"Each person becomes an expert on aging, and the older person is well worth listening to, since he is a rich source of ideas about life," she said. "He has experienced grief and loneliness, and nurses must learn how to handle these emotions by listening to their patients."

Dr. Vivian I. Wood, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin, indicated that fear of illness and medical bills are primary problems of old age. "Three-fourths of the people 65 or over have a chronic disease," she said, "And it is likely that they have lived with it for a long time."

Dr. Wood pointed out that the life span in the United States has not increased, but there are more elderly people living out the expected life span because early childhood diseases have been brought under control. Medical science has not conquered the diseases relating to the causes of death, which she cited as heart disease and cancer.

Dr. Wood said that only four percent of the aged population are in institutions such as nursing homes, general or mental hospitals, and cautioned that nurses should not consider the behavior of these relatively few people characteristic of the elderly. "Another four percent are active in senior citizen clubs, but many others have family ties and are not interested in this activity," she said. "If health or other services could be available at senior centers, more of the aged population might be served."

In contrast to the United States, Denmark has developed geriatric programs designed to assist the elderly in living in their own homes, Mary E Shaughnessy, R.N. told the group. Miss Shaughnessy, and Associate Professor at Duke University, was a fellow with the World Health Organization. She said that day hospitals provide nursing services, hot lunches, baths, and other care at a cost of three to four dollars a day, and keep the elderly from admission to hospitals charging up to one hundred dollars a day.

"The City Health Service also provides housecleanìng services for those unable to care for their homes," she said, "And there are lunch clubs or 'meals-on-wheels1 for those unable to do their own cooking." Health insurance plans provide two-week vacations for the aged, even those in nursing homes, and cover hospital izatio n of patients for up to six weeks to relieve families from the constant care of patients in their homes. Nighttime sitters are also available so that families may get rest if continuing care is required.

Mary Adams, R.N., Associate Professor, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve, spoke of research being done to determine the ways in which families cope with the crises of illness in the homes where there are aged members of the family.

Dr. May Hornback, R.N., Associate wprofessor, Department of Nursing, Health Sciences Unit, The University of Wisconsin, was coordinator for the conference.

RESEARCH GRANT AWARDED

The College of Nursing of the University of Kentucky has been awarded a $1500.00 research grant by the Ohio Valley Regional Medical Program to study the perceptions nine hundred selected registered nurses in Kentucky have of the PANMED Series of Programs in Nursing offered on thirteen educational television stations in Kentucky. The research investigators are Dr. Juanita W. Fleming, Assistant Professor and Miss Irma M. Boite, Director of Continuing Education, College of Nursing, University of Kentucky.

University Extension Presents Awards - Signe S. Cooper, chairman of the Nursing Department of University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, is congratulated by Al P. Nelson (left to right), Delafteld, a former professor in Extension's Journalism Department; Robert E. Gard, founder of Extension's Wisconsin Idea Theatre; and Orrin I. Berge, a professor in Extension's Agricultural Engineering Department. Mrs. Cooper, Gard and Berge each received $1000 Distinguished Service Awards and Nelson was awarded the $1000 Standard Oil Award for teaching excellence at the annual University Extension faculty conference held in Madison.

University Extension Presents Awards - Signe S. Cooper, chairman of the Nursing Department of University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, is congratulated by Al P. Nelson (left to right), Delafteld, a former professor in Extension's Journalism Department; Robert E. Gard, founder of Extension's Wisconsin Idea Theatre; and Orrin I. Berge, a professor in Extension's Agricultural Engineering Department. Mrs. Cooper, Gard and Berge each received $1000 Distinguished Service Awards and Nelson was awarded the $1000 Standard Oil Award for teaching excellence at the annual University Extension faculty conference held in Madison.

Signe S. Cooper, Chairman of the Department of Nursing, University Extension, The University of Wisconsin, has received an Extension Distinguished Service Award.

The $1000 award for outstanding service was also presented to Orrin I. Berge, a professor in Extension's Agricultural Engineering Department and Robert E. Gard, a professor with Extension's Wisconsin Idea Theatre.

Presented at the annual faculty conference in November, the award to Mrs. Cooper recognized her for "guiding a unique continuing education program in nursing from its infancy in the mid-fifties to one that today is nationally recognized."

She has served as chairman of Extension's Nursing Department since it was founded in 1955. Prior to that, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin in Madison. She also served with the Army Nurse Corps in the China- Bu r ma- India theatre during World War II.

Mrs. Cooper has served on the editorial board of several nursing periodicals (including JCEN) and has served as coeditor of Cardiovascular Nursing. She is the author of Contemporary Nursing Practice, published by McGraw-Hill in 1970.

In 1 967, Mrs. Cooper was presented theUnda Richards Award of the National League for Nursing for her pioneering efforts in continuing education in nursing.

Mrs. Cooper earned her bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Wisconsin and her master's degree in education at the University of Minnesota. She also did postgraduate work at Teachers' College, Columbia University.

10.3928/0022-0124-19710101-20

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